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Arts

RTX151VW
Paintings Stolen By Nazis Found - 11 Nov 2013
Images of paintings looted by the Nazis in the 1940s that were discovered by customs officials in a Munich flat. A Jewish group accused Germany of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse.

The chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler’s propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to
sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros.
GERMANY-ART/
RTX157X5
November 10, 2013
General view of an apartment building in Munich November 10, 2013, where it is believed that German customs...
Munich, Germany
General view of apartment building in Munich where it is believed that German customs discovered missing...
General view of an apartment building in Munich November 10, 2013, where it is believed that German customs discovered missing artworks. In the art world, which thrives on discretion, it appears to have been an open secret that Cornelius Gurlitt was sitting on at least part of the collection of his father Hildebrand, who worked for the Nazis selling art branded "degenerate" that was taken from museums or stolen or extorted from Jews fleeing the Holocaust. To everyone else - including, apparently, the Gurlitt clan - it was a shock when authorities reluctantly confirmed a magazine report that a routine customs check had uncovered 1,406 works with a value up to one billion euros ($1.34 billion) hiding in plain sight in Gurlitt's Munich apartment. REUTERS/Michael Dalder (GERMANYCRIME CITYSPACE - Tags: CRIME LAW CITYSPACE)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX155MS
November 08, 2013
German Ekkeheart Gurlitt, cousin of art hoarder Cornelius Gurlitt, gestures during an interview in Barcelona,...
Barcelona, Spain
German Ekkeheart Gurlitt, cousin of art hoarder Cornelius Gurlitt, gestures during an interview in Barcelona...
German Ekkeheart Gurlitt, cousin of art hoarder Cornelius Gurlitt, gestures during an interview in Barcelona, November 7, 2013. Cornelius Gurlitt, in whose Munich apartment German customs seized some 1,400 art works, was a "lonely, tragic figure" never interested in making money, his cousin says. To match Insight GERMANY-ART/ REUTERS/Albert Gea (SPAIN - Tags: SOCIETY)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX152AL
November 06, 2013
The name plate on the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013....
Salzburg, Austria
The name plate on the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg
The name plate on the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler’s propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Dominic Ebenbichler (AUSTRIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT POLITICS CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX152AT
November 06, 2013
The house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A Jewish group...
Salzburg, Austria
The house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg
The house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler’s propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Dominic Ebenbichler (AUSTRIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT POLITICS CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX152A6
November 06, 2013
The house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A Jewish group...
Salzburg, Austria
The house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg
The house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler’s propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Dominic Ebenbichler (AUSTRIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT POLITICS CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX1529Y
November 06, 2013
The entrance of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013....
Salzburg, Austria
The entrance of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg
The entrance of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler’s propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Dominic Ebenbichler (AUSTRIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT POLITICS CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX152AJ
November 06, 2013
The name plate on the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013....
Salzburg, Austria
The name plate on the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg
The name plate on the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler’s propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Dominic Ebenbichler (AUSTRIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT POLITICS CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX1529W
November 06, 2013
The name plate on the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013....
Salzburg, Austria
The name plate on the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg
The name plate on the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler’s propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Dominic Ebenbichler (AUSTRIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT POLITICS CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX152A1
November 06, 2013
The entrance of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013....
Salzburg, Austria
The entrance of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg
The entrance of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler’s propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Dominic Ebenbichler (AUSTRIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT POLITICS CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX152AP
November 06, 2013
The entrance of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013....
Salzburg, Austria
The entrance of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg
The entrance of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt is pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler’s propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Dominic Ebenbichler (AUSTRIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT POLITICS CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX150S7
November 05, 2013
A formerly unknown picture by German artist Ernst Ludwig Kirchner entitled "Melancholic Girl" is beamed...
Augsburg, Germany
Picture "Melancholic Girl" by German artist Kirchner is beamed onto a wall during news conference held...
A formerly unknown picture by German artist Ernst Ludwig Kirchner entitled "Melancholic Girl" is beamed onto a wall during a news conference held by the Augsburg state prosecutor Reinhard Nemetz and expert art historian Meike Hoffmann from the Berlin Free University in Augsburg some 60km (38 miles) west of Munich November 5, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler's propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Michael Dalder (GERMANY - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT CRIME LAW POLITICS SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX150N6
November 05, 2013
Journalists wait for the start of a news conference of expert art historian Meike Hoffmann and Augsburg...
Augsburg, Germany
Journalists wait for start of a news conference of expert art historian Hoffmann and Augsburg state prosecutor...
Journalists wait for the start of a news conference of expert art historian Meike Hoffmann and Augsburg state prosecutor Reinhard Nemetz in Augsburg November 5, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler’s propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Michael Dalder (GERMANY - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT CRIME LAW POLITICS SOCIETY)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX150IQ
November 05, 2013
Augsburg state prosecutor Reinhard Nemetz (C) gestures as he and expert art historian Meike Hoffmann...
Augsburg, Germany
Augsburg state prosecutor Nemetz addresses a news conference in Augsburg
Augsburg state prosecutor Reinhard Nemetz (C) gestures as he and expert art historian Meike Hoffmann (R) from the Berlin Free University address a news conference in Augsburg some 60km (38 miles) west of Munich November 5, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of a war-time art dealer, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Michael Dalder (GERMANY - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT CRIME LAW POLITICS SOCIETY)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX150JW
November 05, 2013
Expert art historian Meike Hoffmann from the Berlin Free University addresses a news conference in Augsburg...
Augsburg, Germany
Expert art historian Hoffmann from the Berlin Free University addresses a news conference in Augsburg...
Expert art historian Meike Hoffmann from the Berlin Free University addresses a news conference in Augsburg some 60km (38 miles) west of Munich November 5, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler’s propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Michael Dalder (GERMANY - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT CRIME LAW POLITICS SOCIETY)
GERMANY-ART/
RTX152AM
November 06, 2013
Windows of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt are pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A...
Salzburg, Austria
Windows of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt are pictured in Salzburg
Windows of the house of art collector Cornelius Gurlitt are pictured in Salzburg November 6, 2013. A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of modern art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse. Customs officials' chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive elderly son of war-time art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who was authorized by Hitler’s propagandist minister Joseph Goebbels to sell art the Nazis stole, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend. The art works missing for more than 70 years could be worth well over one billion euros. REUTERS/Dominic Ebenbichler (AUSTRIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT POLITICS)
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