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A Picture and Its Story

RTX1IJUV
In the Shadow of the Volcano - 01 Jul 2015
“It was really scary, hearing all those rumbling sounds coming from the mountain again,” said Nurheni Ginting, 32.

Ginting and her son, daughter and their 60-year-old grandmother had already been forced to leave the family home to flee the eruption of Mount Sinabung volcano in the Indonesian region of North Sumatra.

Earlier in June the family had left everything behind including their cow and their pet cat.

That was the third time in less than two years the volcano, 5 km away from the village, forced them to leave.

In this photo Ginting’s daughter Ramadinah Milala, 8, was looking at ash billowing from the volcano.

Earlier that day, the family had returned to their village first thing because Nurheni Ginting needed to work in the aubergine fields.

"If I don't have money, I go to pick vegetables and sell them at market,” said her mother Ginting. “I need money to pay for school, for food, for transportation.”

They were due to return to the camp at 6pm. But at around 3.30pm they heard a familiar sound coming from the mountain.

So they and others ran to the public bus to return to a temporary camp for those displaced by the volcano’s eruption at Simpang Empat, about 15 kilometres away.

The family, including Ramadinah’s 13-year-old brother, waited for other villagers to join them in the bus as ash spewed from the volcano.

When this photo was shot the family was en route back to the camp where they had been for the previous two weeks.

“I felt sad as we drove away, especially as Ramadinah was crying and upset,” her mother said.

All their neighbours also had to flee the village earlier in June, except for a few men who stayed behind to guard houses from theft. The family’s home was undamaged and they were able to return from time to time to keep an eye on it.

“As we drove away Ramadinah just sat looking out of the window,” her mother said. “She was quiet and wasn’t talking.”

This was the family’s third time in the camp. The first was from September 2013 for about 10 months, then again from June last year for as long again. After only a few months back in their village, a government order came to evacuate the area.

When the volcano erupted in early 2014 it killed at least 11 people. The government evacuated tens of thousands of local residents.

Ginting said her daughter had now begun to grasp the danger presented by the volcano and its proximity to their village.

“She has recently begun to understand that the volcano can erupt anytime,” her mother said. “After a few villagers died after being hit by lava last year, Ramadinah began to see what could happen.”

Repeated exposure to life in the camp hadn’t improved the mother’s opinion of the difficult conditions there.

““You have to sleep in a big hall full of people,” she said. “Someone is always talking and occasionally there are arguments. At times there’s noisy music playing. It’s impossible to sleep well.”

The family faced a frustrating wait in the camp, she said, far from their source of livelihood.

“For now we just have to sit and wait,” the mother said. “I hope this situation ends soon and we can go home for good and live like we did before.”
INDONESIA-VOLCANO/
RTX1IKWY
July 01, 2015
Ramadinah Milala, 8, and her family drive away from their home, as ash spews from Mount Sinabung volcano...
KARO, Indonesia
A Picture and Its Story: In the Shadow of the Volcano
Ramadinah Milala, 8, and her family drive away from their home, as ash spews from Mount Sinabung volcano at Tiga Serangkai village in Karo Regency, North Sumatra province, Indonesia in this June 24, 2015 file photo. Beawiharta: Ramadinah and her mother, brother and 60-year-old grandmother were first forced to leave the family home in June. When the volcano started rumbling, the family fled, leaving everything behind including their cow and their pet cat. They moved to a temporary camp for those displaced by the volcano’s eruption at Simpang Empat, about 15 kilometres away.
 
On the day the picture was taken, the family had returned to their village in the morning because Nurheni Ginting needed to work in the aubergine fields.
 
"If I don't have money, I go to pick vegetables and sell them at market,” said her mother Ginting. “I need money to pay for school, for food, for transportation.” 
 
They were due to return to the camp at 6pm. But at around 3.30pm they heard a familiar sound coming from the mountain.

“As we drove away Ramadinah just sat looking out of the window,” her mother said. “She was quiet and wasn’t talking.”
 
Ginting said her daughter had now begun to grasp the danger presented by the volcano and its proximity to their village. Repeated exposure to life in the camp hadn’t improved the mother’s opinion of the difficult conditions there.
 
““You have to sleep in a big hall full of people,” she said. “Someone is always talking and occasionally there are arguments. At times there’s noisy music playing. It’s impossible to sleep well.” REUTERS/Beawiharta/Files TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
INDONESIA-VOLCANO/
RTX1IKXS
July 01, 2015
Ramadinah Milala (C), 8, watches television at home with friends at Kuta Tengah village, Karo Regency,...
KARO, Indonesia
A Picture and Its Story: In the Shadow of the Volcano
Ramadinah Milala (C), 8, watches television at home with friends at Kuta Tengah village, Karo Regency, North Sumatra province, Indonesia June 26, 2015. Beawiharta: Ramadinah and her mother, brother and 60-year-old grandmother were first forced to leave the family home in June. When the volcano started rumbling, the family fled, leaving everything behind including their cow and their pet cat. They moved to a temporary camp for those displaced by the volcano’s eruption at Simpang Empat, about 15 kilometres away.
 
On the day the picture was taken, the family had returned to their village in the morning because Nurheni Ginting needed to work in the aubergine fields.
 
"If I don't have money, I go to pick vegetables and sell them at market,” said her mother Ginting. “I need money to pay for school, for food, for transportation.” 
 
They were due to return to the camp at 6pm. But at around 3.30pm they heard a familiar sound coming from the mountain.

“As we drove away Ramadinah just sat looking out of the window,” her mother said. “She was quiet and wasn’t talking.”
 
Ginting said her daughter had now begun to grasp the danger presented by the volcano and its proximity to their village. Repeated exposure to life in the camp hadn’t improved the mother’s opinion of the difficult conditions there.
 
““You have to sleep in a big hall full of people,” she said. “Someone is always talking and occasionally there are arguments. At times there’s noisy music playing. It’s impossible to sleep well.” REUTERS/Beawiharta
INDONESIA-VOLCANO/
RTX1IKXG
July 01, 2015
Ramadinah Milala, 8, (C) poses with neighbours as Mont Sinabung volcano erupts with ash and smoke behind...
KARO, Indonesia
A Picture and Its Story: In the Shadow of the Volcano
Ramadinah Milala, 8, (C) poses with neighbours as Mont Sinabung volcano erupts with ash and smoke behind them, at Kuta Tengah village, Karo Regency, North Sumatra province, Indonesia June 26, 2015. Beawiharta: Ramadinah and her mother, brother and 60-year-old grandmother were first forced to leave the family home in June. When the volcano started rumbling, the family fled, leaving everything behind including their cow and their pet cat. They moved to a temporary camp for those displaced by the volcano’s eruption at Simpang Empat, about 15 kilometres away.
 
On the day the picture was taken, the family had returned to their village in the morning because Nurheni Ginting needed to work in the aubergine fields.
 
"If I don't have money, I go to pick vegetables and sell them at market,” said her mother Ginting. “I need money to pay for school, for food, for transportation.” 
 
They were due to return to the camp at 6pm. But at around 3.30pm they heard a familiar sound coming from the mountain.

“As we drove away Ramadinah just sat looking out of the window,” her mother said. “She was quiet and wasn’t talking.”
 
Ginting said her daughter had now begun to grasp the danger presented by the volcano and its proximity to their village. Repeated exposure to life in the camp hadn’t improved the mother’s opinion of the difficult conditions there.
 
““You have to sleep in a big hall full of people,” she said. “Someone is always talking and occasionally there are arguments. At times there’s noisy music playing. It’s impossible to sleep well.” REUTERS/Beawiharta
INDONESIA-VOLCANO/
RTX1IKXD
July 01, 2015
Ramadinah Milala, 8, (L) poses with her brother Muhidin Milala as Mont Sinabung volcano erupts with ash...
KARO, Indonesia
A Picture and Its Story: In the Shadow of the Volcano
Ramadinah Milala, 8, (L) poses with her brother Muhidin Milala as Mont Sinabung volcano erupts with ash and smoke behind them, at Kuta Tengah village, Karo Regency, North Sumatra province, Indonesia June 26, 2015. Beawiharta: Ramadinah and her mother, brother and 60-year-old grandmother were first forced to leave the family home in June. When the volcano started rumbling, the family fled, leaving everything behind including their cow and their pet cat. They moved to a temporary camp for those displaced by the volcano’s eruption at Simpang Empat, about 15 kilometres away.
 
On the day the picture was taken, the family had returned to their village in the morning because Nurheni Ginting needed to work in the aubergine fields.
 
"If I don't have money, I go to pick vegetables and sell them at market,” said her mother Ginting. “I need money to pay for school, for food, for transportation.” 
 
They were due to return to the camp at 6pm. But at around 3.30pm they heard a familiar sound coming from the mountain.

“As we drove away Ramadinah just sat looking out of the window,” her mother said. “She was quiet and wasn’t talking.”
 
Ginting said her daughter had now begun to grasp the danger presented by the volcano and its proximity to their village. Repeated exposure to life in the camp hadn’t improved the mother’s opinion of the difficult conditions there.
 
““You have to sleep in a big hall full of people,” she said. “Someone is always talking and occasionally there are arguments. At times there’s noisy music playing. It’s impossible to sleep well.” REUTERS/Beawiharta
INDONESIA-VOLCANO/
RTX1IKY0
July 01, 2015
Ramadinah Milala (C), 8, watches television at home with a friend at Kuta Tengah village, Karo Regency,...
KARO, Indonesia
A Picture and Its Story: In the Shadow of the Volcano
Ramadinah Milala (C), 8, watches television at home with a friend at Kuta Tengah village, Karo Regency, North Sumatra province, Indonesia June 26, 2015. Beawiharta: Ramadinah and her mother, brother and 60-year-old grandmother were first forced to leave the family home in June. When the volcano started rumbling, the family fled, leaving everything behind including their cow and their pet cat. They moved to a temporary camp for those displaced by the volcano’s eruption at Simpang Empat, about 15 kilometres away.
 
On the day the picture was taken, the family had returned to their village in the morning because Nurheni Ginting needed to work in the aubergine fields.
 
"If I don't have money, I go to pick vegetables and sell them at market,” said her mother Ginting. “I need money to pay for school, for food, for transportation.” 
 
They were due to return to the camp at 6pm. But at around 3.30pm they heard a familiar sound coming from the mountain.

“As we drove away Ramadinah just sat looking out of the window,” her mother said. “She was quiet and wasn’t talking.”
 
Ginting said her daughter had now begun to grasp the danger presented by the volcano and its proximity to their village. Repeated exposure to life in the camp hadn’t improved the mother’s opinion of the difficult conditions there.
 
““You have to sleep in a big hall full of people,” she said. “Someone is always talking and occasionally there are arguments. At times there’s noisy music playing. It’s impossible to sleep well.” REUTERS/Beawiharta
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