Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Pictures Report

RTS2ITAL
Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Mothers drag their children across three countries, trekking around border checkpoints and crossing rivers in waist-high water as they leave Venezuela for Peru.
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAT
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Maria Valdez, 31, poses for a picture with her children Yoimairy, 9, and Darien, 1,...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Maria Valdez, 31, poses for a picture with her children Yoimairy, 9, and Darien, 1, while they wait to process their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre, before they continue their journey, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 17, 2019. Maria Valdez sold her house one year ago to raise the money to pay for her husband to travel to Peru. "My husband went first, I sent him, but I didn't want to go. But as the money he sent was not enough, we decided to come," Valdez said. "As soon as I was in Caracas, I wanted to return home, the bus was asking for cash and I did not have it, my daughter started crying and saying that she did not want to go, it was horrible." "But because of my children I maintained the strength to continue." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITA7
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Erika Quevedo, 28, poses for a picture with her children Osmariel, 6, and Gabriel,...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Erika Quevedo, 28, poses for a picture with her children Osmariel, 6, and Gabriel, 1, as they wait for transport to continue their journey, after they processed their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service center, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 17. "It's as if we were all blind, wandering here together," Quevedo said of her 8-day trip from her hometown of Barquisimeto in Venezuela. She said she paid guides in Colombia to help her family make the trip, only to find they disappeared with their money. With little cash left, she survived the rest of the trip by banding together with other single mothers she met on the way. "I don't know what I would have done without them," Quevedo said of her female travel mates as they hustled with their kids toward Peru's border. Quevedo said anything beats being a mother in Venezuela. When her son was born, prematurely, she couldn't summon an ambulance or a ride to the hospital. "My son was born in my house and my mom was the midwife". "If it weren't for my mom, my son wouldn't be here." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAR
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Rosalba Barrios, poses for a picture with her daughter Joselin and her two granddaughters...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Rosalba Barrios, poses for a picture with her daughter Joselin and her two granddaughters Horailyn, 11, and Rogerlin, 8, while they wait to process their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre, before they continue their journey, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 16. "We can't survive on what they were sending anymore," said Barrios, a 51-year-old mother of eight crossing the border with a daughter and two grandkids, on their way to join her adult children in Lima. Barrios, a seamstress, described a family torn apart by dysfunction in Venezuela. Within 18 months of each other, she lost her 28-year-old son in one of Caracas' frequent armed robberies and her 83-year-old mother to cancer due shortages of medicine. "Emigrating isn't easy," Barrios said, crying. "I never wanted to leave. Not me. It's not easy to say goodbye. To leave the life you know." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAO
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Marlioth Armas, 28, cries as she poses for a photo, while queueing with her daughter...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Marlioth Armas, 28, cries as she poses for a photo, while queueing with her daughter Erimar, 2, to process their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre, before they continue their journey to Lima, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 16. Armas cried in frustration describing the constant shortages of basic goods in Venezuela. "Milk! Shampoo! Nothing!" said Armas, "I just want to live somewhere we can get things and be normal." Describing the chaos of her journey she said: "We crossed into Colombia walking along a pathway and crossing the river. The truth is, that I don't know why, since I had my border ID, I could have passed through the bridge, and there were people who had passport, I don't understand why we didn't cross by the bridge." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITB4
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Teresa Amaro, 83, from Barquisimeto, poses for a picture with her daughter Maite Perez,...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Teresa Amaro, 83, from Barquisimeto, poses for a picture with her daughter Maite Perez, 43, and her grandson Edwar Coste, 7, while they rest at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre before they continue their journey into Peru, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 15. Amaro, who had previously suffered a heart attack, said: "It is tough to find medicines, and when you find them they are very expensive, and there is not enough money to buy them. We didn't have electricity. We didn't have cooking gas and we were cooking with firewood. By the time we left, we already had a month without gas in the whole area, and we couldn't find firewood either. I did not want to come, but they told me: 'Mama, we're not going to leave you alone.'" REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAX
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Andraimi Laya, 22, poses for a picture carrying her daughter Jessy, while they wait...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Andraimi Laya, 22, poses for a picture carrying her daughter Jessy, while they wait to process their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre, before they continue their journey, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 16. "I really was betting on Guaido. I was sure he was going to change the country," said Andraimi Laya, 22, her 2-year-old wiggling in her arms. When Peru's President Martin Vizcarra announced Venezuelans must have passports and visas to enter Peru starting June 15, Laya dropped everything. She put her dream of becoming a police officer on hold, sold her last valuable possession, her TV, and headed for Peru with her daughter. "I said, 'no, I'm not going to die here. This might be my last chance.'" Laya said. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAU
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Crisyesmil Rosales, 23, poses for a picture with her children Andres, 6, Aranza, 2,...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Crisyesmil Rosales, 23, poses for a picture with her children Andres, 6, Aranza, 2, Sara, 20 months, her sister Angeli, 8, and her brother Abraham, 6, while they wait to process their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service center, before continuing their journey to Arequipa, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 16. Rosales is travelling with her siblings, her children and an aunt. She said that after eight days travelling, the toughest thing of her journey has been to sleep with the children on the street. "My mother is in Peru and as we thought they were going to close the border, she decided to send us money to travel," she said. "My mom was desperate there in Venezuela because if you are able to eat, you can't dress, and if you dress, you don't eat. That is something hard." "I want to give the best to the children, that is the most important. I want to work and a have good job to move forward." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins SEARCH "MOTHERS REFUGEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAH
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Nemesis Ramirez, 22, poses for a picture with her children Ailin, 6, and five-month-old...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Nemesis Ramirez, 22, poses for a picture with her children Ailin, 6, and five-month-old Raimar, while they wait to process their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre, before they continue their journey, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 17. Ramirez is travelling to meet her husband who left Venezuela for Peru three months ago. "I hired a guide, and it was very bad. I would not recommend it to anyone. They left me four days in Cucuta, with the children sleeping on the floor," Ramirez said. "I cried and wanted to return, but my daughter told me that she wanted to continue, that she wanted to keep travelling to see her father. And if she was strong, I had to be stronger than her." "We left everything behind; we just brought things as if we were going the weekend to the beach." "We couldn't bring a single doll for my daughter." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAY
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Suramay Farias, 47, poses for a picture with her daughter Franchesca, 8, while they...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Suramay Farias, 47, poses for a picture with her daughter Franchesca, 8, while they wait to process their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre, before continuing their journey to Chiclayo, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 16. Suramay had never thought about travelling, much less leaving the country, but worried about the future of her youngest daughter and decided to go to Peru where her other children have been living for a year. "They told me, Mama, come here so you can give the girl a chance to have a better diet and a better life," Farias said. "She was in a private school but I had to take her out and put her in a public one close to our house, because if I paid for her school and transportation, I wouldn't have had enough to feed her. I preferred to have her in a public school and at least give her an arepa with butter," she said. "This is very hard because I left my mother, I left my husband, but I have my children here. This is not what I wanted. I would like to have my children in Venezuela". "I love my country, but with the circumstance that we have there, we have to migrate." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAV
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Iris Mejias, 68, poses for a picture with her granddaughter Victoria, 10, while they...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Iris Mejias, 68, poses for a picture with her granddaughter Victoria, 10, while they rest at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre, before continuing their journey to Lima, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 15. Mejias, a nurse with more than 40 years of professional experience, was diagnosed with cancer a few months after her daughter and son-in-law left Venezuela to go to work in Peru, leaving their children under her care. "After having surgery, I have not been able to get chemotherapy because we do not have access to medicines." "I am disappointed that my old age has been stolen. I have worked for over 40 years, but today my salary and pension is not enough to buy food for a week". "I'm doing this trip to bring Victoria to her mother because how would a ten-year-old girl cope when her grandmother, who has been like her mother, dies and suddenly she has no one. How could I leave this girl in limbo?". "I am forced to leave. I have no alternative." Victoria's two older siblings stayed in Venezuela and are completing their studies. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAE
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Elizabeth Rondon, 28, poses for a picture with her children Luis, 5, Samantha, 2 and...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Elizabeth Rondon, 28, poses for a picture with her children Luis, 5, Samantha, 2 and Samuel, four months old, while they wait to process their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre, before they continue their journey to Trujillo, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 17. Rondon, from Maracaibo, one of the hottest areas of Venezuela, said: "There is no life there, you wake up, and you do not have electricity. My son can't go to classes because there is no electricity, and the school doesn't have the right conditions; they don't have water in the bathrooms or for them to drink". "I decided to start teaching him at home in March." With tears running down her face, she said, "One of the toughest things (in Venezuela), was not being able to sleep. As a parent, you are so tired from all you do during the day. To take care of the children, wash their clothes, find food, and have to deal with a power cut at night knowing that it will last at least 12 hours. That's ugly. But it wasn't only one a day. It has been like that in March, April, May, and June until I left, almost every day it was the same." "I want my children to have an education like the one I had." "Most of the people there (in Venezuela) don't even dream of going to university. Mainly because you can't afford it and secondly, the quality is not the same as before." "I want my children to dream in big; I would like them to want to be doctors, engineers, or architects." "I would like to go back to Venezuela, but I would like to see it as I remember it." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAJ
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Juviamdy Garcia, 19, poses for a picture with her son Luian, 2, after having processed...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Juviamdy Garcia, 19, poses for a picture with her son Luian, 2, after having processed their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre, before they continue their journey, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 17. Garcia, a paramedic, is travelling with her son to reunite with her husband who has been living in Peru for a year. "We arrived in San Antonio (in Venezuela) on Monday, and (the guide) helped us cross (the border) using the pathways. When we got to the other side, the Colombian police stopped us and made us return, we had to go back to the river, but that time just with the children, because nobody helped us to return." After a week travelling, "I only have $20 left to get to where I'm going, because I have to go to Lima, but I don't know how far I can get," Garcia said. "My son has been sick; I had to take him to the doctor. He has been under treatment because he has amoebiasis; he had diarrhoea and blood in his stools." "I want to be in my country, my dream is to be a doctor, I studied at the university, but I had to leave because I got pregnant and also because I had a terrible experience. I was in a classroom, and suddenly some men entered with guns, and they robbed us all, they (assaulted) a woman classmate and beat others." "I said to my mother, I didn't want to go there anymore." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITB2
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Genesis Valera, 27, who is six months pregnant, poses for a picture with her children...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Genesis Valera, 27, who is six months pregnant, poses for a picture with her children Sebastian, 7, Claudia, 6, and Isaias, 2, while they wait to process their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre, before they continue their journey to Piura, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 16. "I was waiting for a guide and my mobile phone ran out of battery. I kept waiting in San Antonio (in Venezuela) for a while, but the area didn't have electricity. At some point, people arrived and told me, come, come, you will cross (the border) through the pathways," Valera said. "We walked along the pathways with the children... I went through the water, they told me to shut up because the guerrillas were around." Once in Colombia, Genesis travelled by bus but had to walk part of the way to avoid a checkpoint. "We had to wait in the middle of the bushes for two hours, it was dark and very cold, while we waited for the bus to pick us up again," she said. "I came here to fight. I came to have my new baby here and to work and give them the things they need." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAQ
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Erika Fernandez, 33, poses for a picture with her sons Ronald, 10, and Jose, 3, while...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Erika Fernandez, 33, poses for a picture with her sons Ronald, 10, and Jose, 3, while they wait to process their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre, before they continue their journey, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 16. Fernandez, a nurse, is travelling to meet her husband who has been in Peru for one year. "Everything has been terrible since I left my house and it is still a nightmare, first because of the crowds of people but also all the delays with the buses," she said. "My child has been vomiting since last night, I took him to the Red Cross, and they gave me water to rehydrate him and paracetamol in case he gets a fever," she added. "The toughest part has been to see my children go hungry because I never thought I would see my children like that. They say to me, 'Mama I'm hungry', and I don't have money to give them anything." "I want a better quality of life for my kids, I do not want to teach them that they have to fight for food, but instead, I want to teach them that anyone who works, can buy it." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAC
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Arlene Gerder, 38, poses for a picture with her children Jose, 4, and Dayana, 14,...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Arlene Gerder, 38, poses for a picture with her children Jose, 4, and Dayana, 14, as they wait for a taxi to continue their journey to Pisco, after they processed their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service center, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 17. Gerder left Venezuela for first time seven months ago looking for a better future for her children. She is on her way back to Peru after picking up her children from Venezuela. "I am a licensed nurse. I had two jobs in Venezuela with the government, but the money was not enough to support my children." "In Venezuela, my children were not eating well. My daughter, thank God, was studying in a private school that I paid for from (Peru), but my son wasn't. He was in a state school, he is four years old and when I returned, he did not even know the colours." Crying, she said: "I spent two years planning the journey because it's difficult, you never want to leave your country, your family, stability. Nobody wants it, but then one day we no longer had food, and my daughter told me that she was hungry. We had already eaten the little we had to eat and what was left was for the next day, but she told me that she was hungry and I gave her what I had. The next day, I had to wait for God to provide something. " "That day I decided to go with what I had. I left with $130 and some gold jewellery, that was all that I took with me." "My children will suffer, but here they will suffer with a full stomach." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAS
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Ailin Tua, 43, poses for a picture with her daughters Paola, 18, and Sofia, 13, as...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Ailin Tua, 43, poses for a picture with her daughters Paola, 18, and Sofia, 13, as they wait for a taxi to continue their journey, after they processed their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 17. Tua is a seamstress who had her own workshop, until lack of customers and the high price of raw materials forced her to close. She said that her husband was a truck driver and had a good income. "He killed himself for more than 28 years... on Venezuela's highways, thank God, who took care of him for such long time while working to support us and support his family," but when "the owner of the company where he worked migrated to the United States the business closed." In 2017 her husband left the country, first to Ecuador and then to Peru, but it was not until six months later that he managed to get a stable job and was able to send money back to Venezuela. These were tough months for her husband. "He slept on the street for almost four months," she said. The final trigger take the family out of Venezuela was a kidnap threat, "I received a call and they said: 'Ahilin, I want $350 right now or I'll go to kidnap Paola and Sofia, I will go to their schools.'" "I stopped a taxi, and I went to their schools to pick them up quickly, then we went home, and packed what we could carry in two black trash bags... and ran to my sisters' house." Tua left her daughters living with her sister in another town and migrated to try and establish a new home, before going back to Venezuela to collect her daughters. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Display
Items per page
Page
of 1