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RTR2V5OS
Abandoned "Wonderland" in China - 08 May 2013
Images from the site of abandoned buildings which were to be part of an amusement park called "Wonderland" on the outskirts of Beijing.

According to local media, the demolition of the amusement park will make way for a shopping centre once authorities approve its construction. Wonderland's construction, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers.
CHINA/
RTR2V5F9
December 12, 2011
A building in the shape of a castle stands uncompleted in a field in what would have been an amusement...
Beijing, China
A building in the shape of a castle stands uncompleted in a field in what would have been an amusement...
A building in the shape of a castle stands uncompleted in a field in what would have been an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5F0
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 13 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT...
Beijing, China
A crack is seen in a footpath leading to an abandoned building that was to be part of an amusement park...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 13 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


A crack is seen in a footpath leading to an abandoned building that was to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5F7
December 12, 2011
A view of an entrance to an abandoned building which leads into a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland',...
Beijing, China
A view of an entrance to an abandoned building which leads into a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland',...
A view of an entrance to an abandoned building which leads into a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5F3
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 17 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT...
Beijing, China
Boarded entrance gates are seen at the front of abandoned buildings that were to be part of 'Wonderland',...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 17 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


Boarded entrance gates are seen at the front of abandoned buildings that were to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA/
RTR2V5F6
December 12, 2011
The entrance to an abandoned building leads into a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the...
Beijing, China
The entrance to an abandoned building leads into a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the...
The entrance to an abandoned building leads into a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5ET
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 7 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK...
Beijing, China
A view of abandoned buildings that were to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 7 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


A view of abandoned buildings that were to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY) FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE ALSO SEE: GF2EB150MH301
CHINA/
RTR2V5FA
December 12, 2011
A building in the shape of a castle stands uncompleted in a field in what would have been an amusement...
Beijing, China
A building stands uncompleted in a field in what would have been an amusement park called 'Wonderland',...
A building in the shape of a castle stands uncompleted in a field in what would have been an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5FE
December 12, 2011
A view of entrances to an abandoned building which lead into a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland',...
Beijing, China
A view of entrances to an abandoned building which lead into a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland',...
A view of entrances to an abandoned building which lead into a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5F5
December 12, 2011
An abandoned building is seen through an entrance leading into what would have been an amusement park...
Beijing, China
An abandoned building is seen through an entrance leading into what would have been an amusement park...
An abandoned building is seen through an entrance leading into what would have been an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5EZ
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 14 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT...
Beijing, China
A sign for 'Wonderland' adorns an abandoned building that was to be part of the amusement park on the...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 14 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


A sign for 'Wonderland' adorns an abandoned building that was to be part of the amusement park on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA/
RTR2V5FI
December 12, 2011
Footsteps in fresh snow are seen across a walkway leading to the entrance of a derelict amusement park...
Beijing, China
Footsteps in fresh snow are seen across a walkway leading to the entrance of a derelict amusement park...
Footsteps in fresh snow are seen across a walkway leading to the entrance of a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5FG
December 12, 2011
A view of a vacant carpark in front of abandoned buildings that were to be part of an amusement park...
Beijing, China
A view of a vacant carpark in front of abandoned buildings that were to be part of 'Wonderland', on the...
A view of a vacant carpark in front of abandoned buildings that were to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE)
CHINA/
RTR2V5F8
December 12, 2011
The steel frame of an abandoned building stands in what would have been an amusement park called 'Wonderland',...
Beijing, China
The steel frame of an abandoned building stands in what would have been an amusement park called 'Wonderland',...
The steel frame of an abandoned building stands in what would have been an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011.REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE)
CHINA/
RTR2V5F4
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 18 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT...
Beijing, China
A farmer carries a shovel over his shoulder as he walks through an abandoned building, that was to be...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 18 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


A farmer carries a shovel over his shoulder as he walks through an abandoned building, that was to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', to tend his crops on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5F2
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 16 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT...
Beijing, China
A farmer walks through an abandoned building, that was to be part of 'Wonderland', to tend his crops...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 16 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


A farmer carries a shovel over his shoulder as he walks through an abandoned building, that was to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', to tend his crops on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA/
RTR2V5F1
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 15 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT...
Beijing, China
Farmers dismantle a tower in a field that includes abandoned buildings that were to be part of 'Wonderland',...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 15 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


Farmers dismantle a tower in a field that includes abandoned buildings that were to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5EY
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 12 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT...
Beijing, China
Farmers dig a water well in a field that includes an abandoned building that was to be part of an amusement...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 12 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


Farmers dig a water well in a field that includes an abandoned building that was to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5EX
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 11 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT...
Beijing, China
Corn grows in a field next to an abandoned building that was to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland',...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 11 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


Corn grows in a field next to an abandoned building that was to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION AGRICULTURE)
CHINA/
RTR2V5EW
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 10 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT...
Beijing, China
Writing on a gate tells people to "be responsible for your actions" when entering an abandoned building...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 10 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


Writing on a gate tells people to "be responsible for your actions" when entering an abandoned building that was to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA/
RTR2V5EV
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 9 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK...
Beijing, China
Tree branches line an entrance into an abandoned building that was to be part of an amusement park called...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 9 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


Tree branches line an entrance into an abandoned building that was to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5ER
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 5 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK...
Beijing, China
A stone covered in fresh snow sits in the ruins of an abandoned building that was to be part of 'Wonderland',...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 5 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


A stone covered in fresh snow sits in the ruins of an abandoned building that was to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION ENVIRONMENT)
CHINA/
RTR2V5EP
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 4 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK...
Beijing, China
A sign warning people about potential poisons in the soil is pasted on a pillar of an abandoned building...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 4 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


A sign warning people about potential poisons in the soil is pasted on a pillar of an abandoned building that was to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011.REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5EO
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 3 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK...
Beijing, China
A view of a walkway covered in fresh snow in front of abandoned buildings that were to be part of 'Wonderland',...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 3 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


A view of a walkway covered in fresh snow in front of abandoned buildings that were to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5EN
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 2 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK...
Beijing, China
Cracks are seen in a carpark in front of abandoned buildings that were to be part of 'Wonderland', on...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 2 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


Cracks are seen in a carpark in front of abandoned buildings that were to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION)
CHINA/
RTR2V5EM
December 12, 2011
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 1 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK...
Beijing, China
A farmer walks to tend his crops in a field that includes an abandoned building, that was to be part...
ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 1 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


A farmer carries a shovel over his shoulder as he walks to tend his crops in a field that includes an abandoned building, that was to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION) FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE ALSO SEE: GF2EB150MBE01
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