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Environment

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Climate Change Threatens Lifestyle of Panama's Guna Tribe - 02 Nov 2012
Climate Change Threatens Lifestyle of Panama's Guna Tribe - 02 Nov 2012
PANAMA-ENVIRONMENT/
RTR39W1H
November 02, 2012
An indigenous Guna man looks at a tapir, caught by an indigenous hunter (not pictured), to be shared...
Kuna Yala, Panama
An indigenous Guna man looks at a tapir, caught by an indigenous hunter to be shared with Carti Sugdub...
An indigenous Guna man looks at a tapir, caught by an indigenous hunter (not pictured), to be shared with the Carti Sugdub island community at the Comarca of Kuna Yala in Panama September 4, 2012. Every rainy season, the Guna people living on the Panamanian white sand archipelago of San Blas brace themselves for waves gushing into their tiny mud-floor huts. Rising ocean levels caused by global warming and decades of coral reef destruction have combined with seasonal rains to submerge the Caribbean islands for days on end. Once rare, flooding is now so menacing that the Guna have agreed to abandon ancestral lands for an area within their semi-autonomous territory on the east coast of the mainland. Picture taken September 4, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso (PANAMA - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
PANAMA-ENVIRONMENT/
RTR39W1F
November 02, 2012
Indigenous Guna residents stand outside a house in Carti Sugdub island at the Comarca of Kuna Yala September...
Kuna Yala, Panama
Indigenous Guna residents stand outside a house in Carti Sugdub island at the Comarca of Kuna Yala
Indigenous Guna residents stand outside a house in Carti Sugdub island at the Comarca of Kuna Yala September 4, 2012. Every rainy season, the Guna people living on the Panamanian white sand archipelago of San Blas brace themselves for waves gushing into their tiny mud-floor huts. Rising ocean levels caused by global warming and decades of coral reef destruction have combined with seasonal rains to submerge the Caribbean islands for days on end. Once rare, flooding is now so menacing that the Guna have agreed to abandon ancestral lands for an area within their semi-autonomous territory on the east coast of the mainland. Picture taken September 4, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso (PANAMA - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
PANAMA-ENVIRONMENT/
RTR39W32
November 02, 2012
Indigenous Guna students disembark on one of the islands at the Comarca of Kuna Yala September 4, 2012....
Kuna Yala, Panama
Indigenous Guna students disembark on one of the islands at the Comarca of Kuna Yala
Indigenous Guna students disembark on one of the islands at the Comarca of Kuna Yala September 4, 2012. Every rainy season, the Guna people living on the Panamanian white sand archipelago of San Blas brace themselves for waves gushing into their tiny mud-floor huts. Rising ocean levels caused by global warming and decades of coral reef destruction have combined with seasonal rains to submerge the Caribbean islands for days on end. Once rare, flooding is now so menacing that the Guna have agreed to abandon ancestral lands for an area within their semi-autonomous territory on the east coast of the mainland. Picture taken September 4, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso (PANAMA - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
PANAMA-ENVIRONMENT/
RTR39W1L
November 02, 2012
An indigenous Guna woman looks out from the doorstep of her house as a resident passes by in Carti Sugdub...
Kuna Yala, Panama
An indigenous Guna woman looks out from the doorstep of her house as a resident passes by in Carti Sugdub...
An indigenous Guna woman looks out from the doorstep of her house as a resident passes by in Carti Sugdub island at the Coamarca of Kuna Yala in Panama September 4, 2012. Every rainy season, the Guna people living on the Panamanian white sand archipelago of San Blas brace themselves for waves gushing into their tiny mud-floor huts. Rising ocean levels caused by global warming and decades of coral reef destruction have combined with seasonal rains to submerge the Caribbean islands for days on end. Once rare, flooding is now so menacing that the Guna have agreed to abandon ancestral lands for an area within their semi-autonomous territory on the east coast of the mainland. Picture taken September 4, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso (PANAMA - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
PANAMA-ENVIRONMENT/
RTR39W17
November 02, 2012
An indigenous Guna man stands at the doorstep of his house in Carti Sugdub island at the Comarca of Kuna...
Kuna Yala, Panama
An indigenous Guna man stands at the doorstep of his house in Carti Sugdub island at the Comarca of Kuna...
An indigenous Guna man stands at the doorstep of his house in Carti Sugdub island at the Comarca of Kuna Yala in Panama September 3, 2012. Every rainy season, the Guna people living on the Panamanian white sand archipelago of San Blas brace themselves for waves gushing into their tiny mud-floor huts. Rising ocean levels caused by global warming and decades of coral reef destruction have combined with seasonal rains to submerge the Caribbean islands for days on end. Once rare, flooding is now so menacing that the Guna have agreed to abandon ancestral lands for an area within their semi-autonomous territory on the east coast of the mainland. Picture taken September 3, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso (PANAMA - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
PANAMA-ENVIRONMENT/
RTR39W15
November 02, 2012
Fish are seen on a canoe after being caught in Carti Sugdub island at the Comarca of Kuna Yala in Panama...
Kuna Yala, Panama
Fish are seen on a canoe after being caught in Carti Sugdub island at the Comarca of Kuna Yala in Panama...
Fish are seen on a canoe after being caught in Carti Sugdub island at the Comarca of Kuna Yala in Panama September 3, 2012. Every rainy season, the Guna people living on the Panamanian white sand archipelago of San Blas brace themselves for waves gushing into their tiny mud-floor huts. Rising ocean levels caused by global warming and decades of coral reef destruction have combined with seasonal rains to submerge the Caribbean islands for days on end. Once rare, flooding is now so menacing that the Guna have agreed to abandon ancestral lands for an area within their semi-autonomous territory on the east coast of the mainland. Picture taken September 3, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso (PANAMA - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT MARITIME)
PANAMA-ENVIRONMENT/
RTR39W0F
November 02, 2012
Indigenous Guna fishermen fish in their canoes in the Comarca of Kuna Yala in Panama September 2, 2012....
Kuna Yala, Panama
Indigenous Guna fishermen fish in their canoes in the Comarca of Kuna Yala in Panama
Indigenous Guna fishermen fish in their canoes in the Comarca of Kuna Yala in Panama September 2, 2012. Every rainy season, the Guna people living on the Panamanian white sand archipelago of San Blas brace themselves for waves gushing into their tiny mud-floor huts. Rising ocean levels caused by global warming and decades of coral reef destruction have combined with seasonal rains to submerge the Caribbean islands for days on end. Once rare, flooding is now so menacing that the Guna have agreed to abandon ancestral lands for an area within their semi-autonomous territory on the east coast of the mainland. Picture taken September 2, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso (PANAMA - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT MARITIME)
PANAMA-ENVIRONMENT/
RTR39VZX
November 02, 2012
Carti Sugdub island is seen at the Comarca of Kuna Yala in Panama September 2, 2012. Every rainy season,...
Kuna Yala, Panama
Carti Sugdub island is seen at the Comarca of Kuna Yala in Panama
Carti Sugdub island is seen at the Comarca of Kuna Yala in Panama September 2, 2012. Every rainy season, the Guna people living on the Panamanian white sand archipelago of San Blas brace themselves for waves gushing into their tiny mud-floor huts. Rising ocean levels caused by global warming and decades of coral reef destruction have combined with seasonal rains to submerge the Caribbean islands for days on end. Once rare, flooding is now so menacing that the Guna have agreed to abandon ancestral lands for an area within their semi-autonomous territory on the east coast of the mainland. Picture taken September 2, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso (PANAMA - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
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