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RTR3F94Q
Cuba's Real Estate Market - 21 Mar 2013
Recent and archive images of various properties in Cuba. In November 2011, the government decreed that Cubans could buy and sell homes for the first time since the early days of the revolution, paving the way for a real estate market that has become an exercise in bare-knuckled capitalism.

"For Sale" signs are now a common sight on homes and apartments across the country, more than 100,000 properties are posted for sale on Internet sites and even state television has gotten in on the act, devoting part of a daily show to sales announcements sent in by viewers.

Havana was once considered an architectural jewel with an eclectic mix of colonial homes and modern Art Deco construction, but much of the city outside the touristy Old Havana district is in a dilapidated state after decades of neglect and corrosion from humidity and salty sea air.
CUBA-HOUSING/
RTR3F7S4
March 20, 2013
Tourists take a ride in a convertible car next to a building undergoing renovation on Havana's prime...
Havana, Cuba
Tourists take a ride in a convertible car next to a building undergoing renovation on Havana's prime...
Tourists take a ride in a convertible car next to a building undergoing renovation on Havana's prime real estate area of the "The Malecon" seafront boulevard March 18, 2013. In November 2011, the government decreed that Cubans could buy and sell homes for the first time since the early days of the revolution, paving the way for a real estate market that has become an exercise in bare-knuckled capitalism. Havana was once considered an architectural jewel with an eclectic mix of colonial homes and modern Art Deco construction, but much of the city outside the touristy Old Havana district is in a dilapidated state after decades of neglect and corrosion from humidity and salty sea air. Picture taken March 18, 2013. To match Feature CUBA-HOUSING/ REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: SOCIETY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
CUBA/
RTXTOIS
October 20, 2010
Cuban dissident Guillermo Farinas stands at the door of his home in Santa Clara at dawn after hearing...
Santa Clara, Cuba
Cuban dissident Farinas stands at the door of his home in Santa Clara at dawn after hearing news of his...
Cuban dissident Guillermo Farinas stands at the door of his home in Santa Clara at dawn after hearing news of his winning the Sakharov Award October 21, 2010. The European Parliament will award its top human rights prize on Thursday to Cuban dissident Guillermo Farinas, whose hunger strike this year helped pressure Havana into releasing political prisoners, parliamentary sources said. Cuba views dissidents as U.S. mercenaries working to topple the Cuban government. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY IMAGES OF THE DAY)
CUBA/
RTX5F84
January 10, 2008
A woman walks on a street in central Havana early January 10, 2008. Cuba, a one-party state, will hold...
Havana, Cuba
A woman walks on a street in central Havana
A woman walks on a street in central Havana early January 10, 2008. Cuba, a one-party state, will hold elections on January 20, 2008, to elect the 614-seat National Assembly or legislature. REUTERS/Claudia Daut (CUBA)
CUBA-REFORM/HOUSING
RTR2TLDF
November 04, 2011
A man cycles beside a house in Havana's upmarket Miramar district, November 3, 2011. Cuba's government...
Havana, Cuba
A man cycles beside a house in Havana's upmarket Miramar district
A man cycles beside a house in Havana's upmarket Miramar district, November 3, 2011. Cuba's government has given Cubans the right to buy and sell their homes for the first time since the early days of the 1959 revolution in a long-awaited reform that creates a real estate market and promises to put money in people's pockets. The housing change follows the recent reform of allowing people to more freely buy and sell cars, another change overturning one of the early tenets of the revolution. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS BUSINESS)
CUBA/
RTR1S83E
July 24, 2007
Meple, a psychologist and university professor, walks down the staircase as his seven-month old daughter...
Havana, Cuba
Meple walks down the staircase in their home in the Cerro neighborhood in Havana
Meple, a psychologist and university professor, walks down the staircase as his seven-month old daughter Africa takes a nap on a mat on the floor at their home in the Cerro neighborhood in Havana July 22, 2007. Meple shares the spacious pre-revolution apartment with his partner Simone, an actress and the owner of the place, with their daughter Africa and Simone's 15-year old daughter Samanta from a previous relationship. Picture taken July 22, 2007
REUTERS/Claudia Daut (CUBA)
CUBA-HOUSING/
RTR3F7RS
March 20, 2013
A woman stands at the entrance of her home on sale for $5,000, in Havana's Vedado area March 19, 2013....
Havana, Cuba
A woman stands at the entrance of her home on sale, in Havana's Vedado area
A woman stands at the entrance of her home on sale for $5,000, in Havana's Vedado area March 19, 2013. In November 2011, the government decreed that Cubans could buy and sell homes for the first time since the early days of the revolution, paving the way for a real estate market that has become an exercise in bare-knuckled capitalism. Havana was once considered an architectural jewel with an eclectic mix of colonial homes and modern Art Deco construction, but much of the city outside the touristy Old Havana district is in a dilapidated state after decades of neglect and corrosion from humidity and salty sea air. To match Feature CUBA-HOUSING/ REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: SOCIETY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS)
CUBA
RTR1I6YU
October 09, 2006
A woman stands on the balcony of her house, which is located along the block-long painting known as "Callejon...
Havana, Cuba
A woman stands on the balcony of her house along "Callejon de Hamel" in Centro Havana
A woman stands on the balcony of her house, which is located along the block-long painting known as "Callejon de Hamel" (Hamel street) in Centro Havana October 10, 2006. Initiated by the painter Salvador Gonzales in 1990, it highlights the African influences on Cuban culture and religion. Moreover, it is also designed as a cultural platform within the community and acts as a public temple to the Santeria religion. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (CUBA)
CUBA-HOUSING/
RTR3F7SB
March 20, 2013
A car is driven beside colonial-style houses on Havana's prime real estate area of the "The Malecon"...
Havana, Cuba
A car is driven beside colonial-style houses on Havana's prime real estate area of the "The Malecon"...
A car is driven beside colonial-style houses on Havana's prime real estate area of the "The Malecon" seafront boulevard March 18, 2013. In November 2011, the government decreed that Cubans could buy and sell homes for the first time since the early days of the revolution, paving the way for a real estate market that has become an exercise in bare-knuckled capitalism. Havana was once considered an architectural jewel with an eclectic mix of colonial homes and modern Art Deco construction, but much of the city outside the touristy Old Havana district is in a dilapidated state after decades of neglect and corrosion from humidity and salty sea air. Picture taken March 18, 2013. To match Feature CUBA-HOUSING/ REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: SOCIETY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS)
CUBA-REFORM/HOUSING
RTR2TLDJ
November 04, 2011
People walk beside a soviet-era housing block in Havana, November 3, 2011. Cuba's government has given...
Havana, Cuba
People walk beside a soviet-era housing block in Havana
People walk beside a soviet-era housing block in Havana, November 3, 2011. Cuba's government has given Cubans the right to buy and sell their homes for the first time since the early days of the 1959 revolution in a long-awaited reform that creates a real estate market and promises to put money in people's pockets. The housing change follows the recent reform of allowing people to more freely buy and sell cars, another change overturning one of the early tenets of the revolution. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS BUSINESS)
CUBA-CASTRO/USA
RTR1K0FM
December 03, 2006
Children sit at the door of a house next to an old man in Havana December 3, 2006. Cuba's acting president,...
Havana, Cuba
Children sits at the door of a house next to a old man in Havana
Children sit at the door of a house next to an old man in Havana December 3, 2006. Cuba's acting president, Raul Castro, departing from his brother's confrontational approach to their arch-enemy the United States, said this weekend he was open for talks with Washington. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CUBA)
CUBA-HOUSING/
RTR3F7N3
March 20, 2013
A child stands at the door of a farm with a "For Sale" notice on the outskirts of Havana March 19, 2013....
Havana, Cuba
A child stands at the door of a farm with a ´for sale´ notice on the outskirts of Havana
A child stands at the door of a farm with a "For Sale" notice on the outskirts of Havana March 19, 2013. In November 2011, the government decreed that Cubans could buy and sell homes for the first time since the early days of the revolution, paving the way for a real estate market that has become an exercise in bare-knuckled capitalism. Havana was once considered an architectural jewel with an eclectic mix of colonial homes and modern Art Deco construction, but much of the city outside the touristy Old Havana district is in a dilapidated state after decades of neglect and corrosion from humidity and salty sea air. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: SOCIETY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS)
CUBA HOUSING
RTRG5NA
June 29, 2005
Buildings created in the colonial and art deco architectural style line Havana's seafront boulevard El...
Havana, Cuba
Buildings on Havana's seafront boulevard El Malecon.
Buildings created in the colonial and art deco architectural style line Havana's seafront boulevard El Malecon June 30, 2005. According to a National Housing Institute report issued this week, Cuba acknowledged that the island of 11 million people faces a severe housing shortage and that Cuba would need to build 50,000 houses a year over the next decade to solve the massive deficit. "The eradication of precarious living conditions has been a permanent and still unfulfilled goal of the Cuban Revolution," said the report presented at a U.N.-sponsored conference on urban development. Picture taken June 30, 2005 REUTERS/Claudia Daut CD/CN
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