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RTR3FJYO
Rebuilding a war-torn town - 01 Feb 2013
With neighbouring Croatia set to join the European Union on July 1, Mostar stands as a grim example of how far the country has fallen behind.
BOSNIA
RTXY84D
April 04, 2013
People walk across on a bridge in Mostar in June 1993 (L), and February 23, 2013, in this combination...
Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Combo picture shows people walking across on a bridge in Mostar
People walk across on a bridge in Mostar in June 1993 (L), and February 23, 2013, in this combination picture. Bosnia marks the 21st anniversary of the 1992-95 war on April 6, which finds the Balkan country deeply divided, with power shared uneasily between Serbs, Croats and Muslims in an unwieldy state ruled by ethnic quotas. Some 100,000 people died and two million people were forced from their homes during the ethnic cleansing. Slow-motion intervention eventually brought peace, but at the cost of ethnic segregation. The country's southern town of Mostar, where 70,000 people live, has resisted reconciliation, and marks the anniversary without a budget to fund its basic public services. The fighting between Muslims, known as Bosniaks, and the Croats in Mostar was some of the fiercest of the war and left them divided on the eastern and western banks of the River Neretva. REUTERS/Edin Kundalic/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: CONFLICT SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)
BOSNIA
RTXY848
April 04, 2013
People walk past damaged buildings on the main Marsala Tita street in Mostar in June 1993 (L), and people...
Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Combo picture shows people walking past damaged buildings on the main Marsala Tita street in Mostar,...
People walk past damaged buildings on the main Marsala Tita street in Mostar in June 1993 (L), and people walk on the same street on February 23, 2013, in this combination picture. Bosnia marks the 21st anniversary of the 1992-95 war on April 6, which finds the Balkan country deeply divided, with power shared uneasily between Serbs, Croats and Muslims in an unwieldy state ruled by ethnic quotas. Some 100,000 people died and two million people were forced from their homes during the ethnic cleansing. Slow-motion intervention eventually brought peace, but at the cost of ethnic segregation. The country's southern town of Mostar, where 70,000 people live, has resisted reconciliation, and marks the anniversary without a budget to fund its basic public services. The fighting between Muslims, known as Bosniaks, and the Croats in Mostar was some of the fiercest of the war and left them divided on the eastern and western banks of the River Neretva. REUTERS/Edin Kundalic/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: CONFLICT SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)
BOSNIA
RTXY840
April 04, 2013
The Mehmed Pasina mosque is seen in Mostar in a damaged condition in June 1993 (top), and on February...
Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Combo picture shows the damaged Mehmed Pasina mosque in Mostar, and the same location almost 20 years...
The Mehmed Pasina mosque is seen in Mostar in a damaged condition in June 1993 (top), and on February 23, 2013, in this combination picture. Bosnia marks the 21st anniversary of the 1992-95 war on April 6, which finds the Balkan country deeply divided, with power shared uneasily between Serbs, Croats and Muslims in an unwieldy state ruled by ethnic quotas. Some 100,000 people died and two million people were forced from their homes during the ethnic cleansing. Slow-motion intervention eventually brought peace, but at the cost of ethnic segregation. The country's southern town of Mostar, where 70,000 people live, has resisted reconciliation, and marks the anniversary without a budget to fund its basic public services. The fighting between Muslims, known as Bosniaks, and the Croats in Mostar was some of the fiercest of the war and left them divided on the eastern and western banks of the River Neretva. REUTERS/Edin Kundalic/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: RELIGION CONFLICT ANNIVERSARY)
BOSNIA
RTXY83W
April 04, 2013
People prepare to cross over on a bridge in Mostar city in June 1993 (top), with the same location seen...
Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Combo picture shows people preparing to cross over on a bridge in Mostar city, with the same location...
People prepare to cross over on a bridge in Mostar city in June 1993 (top), with the same location seen on February 23, 2013, in this combination picture. Bosnia marks the 21st anniversary of the 1992-95 war on April 6, which finds the Balkan country deeply divided, with power shared uneasily between Serbs, Croats and Muslims in an unwieldy state ruled by ethnic quotas. Some 100,000 people died and two million people were forced from their homes during the ethnic cleansing. Slow-motion intervention eventually brought peace, but at the cost of ethnic segregation. The country's southern town of Mostar, where 70,000 people live, has resisted reconciliation, and marks the anniversary without a budget to fund its basic public services. The fighting between Muslims, known as Bosniaks, and the Croats in Mostar was some of the fiercest of the war and left them divided on the eastern and western banks of the River Neretva. REUTERS/Edin Kundalic/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: CONFLICT SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)
BOSNIA
RTXY838
April 04, 2013
People cross over on a bridge in Mostar city in June 1993 (top), and the same location is seen on February...
Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Combo picture shows people crossing over on a bridge in Mostar city, and the same location again almost...
People cross over on a bridge in Mostar city in June 1993 (top), and the same location is seen on February 23, 2013, in this combination picture. Bosnia marks the 21st anniversary of the 1992-95 war on April 6, which finds the Balkan country deeply divided, with power shared uneasily between Serbs, Croats and Muslims in an unwieldy state ruled by ethnic quotas. Some 100,000 people died and two million people were forced from their homes during the ethnic cleansing. Slow-motion intervention eventually brought peace, but at the cost of ethnic segregation. The country's southern town of Mostar, where 70,000 people live, has resisted reconciliation, and marks the anniversary without a budget to fund its basic public services. The fighting between Muslims, known as Bosniaks, and the Croats in Mostar was some of the fiercest of the war and left them divided on the eastern and western banks of the River Neretva. REUTERS/Edin Kundalic/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: CONFLICT SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)
BOSNIA
RTXY831
April 04, 2013
Damaged buildings are seen in the old part of Mostar city in June 1993 (top), and the same location is...
Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Combo picture shows damaged buildings in the old part of Mostar city and the same location almost 20...
Damaged buildings are seen in the old part of Mostar city in June 1993 (top), and the same location is seen on February 23, 2013, in this combination picture. Bosnia marks the 21st anniversary of the 1992-95 war on April 6, which finds the Balkan country deeply divided, with power shared uneasily between Serbs, Croats and Muslims in an unwieldy state ruled by ethnic quotas. Some 100,000 people died and two million people were forced from their homes during the ethnic cleansing. Slow-motion intervention eventually brought peace, but at the cost of ethnic segregation. The country's southern town of Mostar, where 70,000 people live, has resisted reconciliation, and marks the anniversary without a budget to fund its basic public services. The fighting between Muslims, known as Bosniaks, and the Croats in Mostar was some of the fiercest of the war and left them divided on the eastern and western banks of the River Neretva. REUTERS/Edin Kundalic/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: CONFLICT SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY) )
BOSNIA
RTXY82I
April 04, 2013
Destroyed buildings are seen on Santiceva street in Mostar in June 1993, and the same street is seen...
Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Combo picture shows destroyed buildings on Santiceva street in Mostar, and the same street almost 20...
Destroyed buildings are seen on Santiceva street in Mostar in June 1993, and the same street is seen on February 20, 2013, in this combination picture. Bosnia marks the 21st anniversary of the 1992-95 war on April 6, which finds the Balkan country deeply divided, with power shared uneasily between Serbs, Croats and Muslims in an unwieldy state ruled by ethnic quotas. Some 100,000 people died and two million people were forced from their homes during the ethnic cleansing. Slow-motion intervention eventually brought peace, but at the cost of ethnic segregation. The country's southern town of Mostar, where 70,000 people live, has resisted reconciliation, and marks the anniversary without a budget to fund its basic public services. The fighting between Muslims, known as Bosniaks, and the Croats in Mostar was some of the fiercest of the war and left them divided on the eastern and western banks of the River Neretva. REUTERS/Edin Kundalic/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: CONFLICT SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY) )
BOSNIA
RTXY822
April 04, 2013
Damaged buildings are seen in the old part of Mostar city in June 1993, and the same location is seen...
Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Combo picture shows damaged buildings in the old part of Mostar city, and the same location almost 20...
Damaged buildings are seen in the old part of Mostar city in June 1993, and the same location is seen on February 23, 2013, in this combination picture. Bosnia marks the 21st anniversary of the 1992-95 war on April 6, which finds the Balkan country deeply divided, with power shared uneasily between Serbs, Croats and Muslims in an unwieldy state ruled by ethnic quotas. Some 100,000 people died and two million people were forced from their homes during the ethnic cleansing. Slow-motion intervention eventually brought peace, but at the cost of ethnic segregation. The country's southern town of Mostar, where 70,000 people live, has resisted reconciliation, and marks the anniversary without a budget to fund its basic public services. The fighting between Muslims, known as Bosniaks, and the Croats in Mostar was some of the fiercest of the war and left them divided on the eastern and western banks of the River Neretva. REUTERS/Edin Kundalic/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: ANNIVERSARY SOCIETY)
BOSNIA
RTXY81C
April 04, 2013
Men cross a river using a bridge in Mostar in June 1993 (top), and the same location is seen again on...
Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Combo picture shows men crossing a river using a bridge in Mostar, and the same location almost 20 years...
Men cross a river using a bridge in Mostar in June 1993 (top), and the same location is seen again on February 23, 2013, in this combination picture. Bosnia marks the 21st anniversary of the 1992-95 war on April 6, which finds the Balkan country deeply divided, with power shared uneasily between Serbs, Croats and Muslims in an unwieldy state ruled by ethnic quotas. Some 100,000 people died and two million people were forced from their homes during the ethnic cleansing. Slow-motion intervention eventually brought peace, but at the cost of ethnic segregation. The country's southern town of Mostar, where 70,000 people live, has resisted reconciliation, and marks the anniversary without a budget to fund its basic public services. The fighting between Muslims, known as Bosniaks, and the Croats in Mostar was some of the fiercest of the war and left them divided on the eastern and western banks of the River Neretva. REUTERS/Edin Kundalic/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: SOCIETY)
BOSNIA
RTXY80Y
April 04, 2013
A man reads on the steps of a building in the destroyed section of the old city of Mostar in June 1993,...
Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Combo picture shows a man reading on the steps of a building in the destroyed section of the old city...
A man reads on the steps of a building in the destroyed section of the old city of Mostar in June 1993, and the same street is seen on February 23, 2013, in this combination picture. Bosnia marks the 21st anniversary of the 1992-95 war on April 6, which finds the Balkan country deeply divided, with power shared uneasily between Serbs, Croats and Muslims in an unwieldy state ruled by ethnic quotas. Some 100,000 people died and two million people were forced from their homes during the ethnic cleansing. Slow-motion intervention eventually brought peace, but at the cost of ethnic segregation. The country's southern town of Mostar, where 70,000 people live, has resisted reconciliation, and marks the anniversary without a budget to fund its basic public services. The fighting between Muslims, known as Bosniaks, and the Croats in Mostar was some of the fiercest of the war and left them divided on the eastern and western banks of the River Neretva. REUTERS/Edin Kundalic/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: ANNIVERSARY POLITICS SOCIETY)
BOSNIA-MOSTAR/
RTR3DDKH
February 05, 2013
The restored old stone bridge over Neretva river is seen in Mostar February 1, 2013. Paralysed by politicking,...
Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
The restored old stone bridge over Neretva river is seen in Mostar
The restored old stone bridge over Neretva river is seen in Mostar February 1, 2013. Paralysed by politicking, the Bosnian town of Mostar has entered 2013 without a budget to run soup-kitchens or kindergartens, to pay fire-fighters or heat schools. The cash is running out, and tensions are rising. It's a situation that observers say cannot go on, but somehow does, and in many ways is a microcosm of Bosnia in its dysfunction and stunted development.
With neighbouring Croatia set to join the European Union on July 1, Mostar stands as a grim example of how far the country has fallen behind. Picture is taken on February 1. To match feature BOSNIA-MOSTAR/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: SOCIETY)
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