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Struggles For Survival In The Amazon - 3 Apr 2014
Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru.

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BRAZIL/
RTR3JRFU
April 03, 2014
A view of the Envira river in Huni Kui territory in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 8, 2014....
Acre, Brazil
A view of the Envira river in Huni Kui territory of Brazil's northwestern Acre state
A view of the Envira river in Huni Kui territory in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 8, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 8, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
A Madija Indian child walks from one of the village huts which is a frequent target of raids by uncontacted...
DSAMA, Brazil
A Madija Indian child walks from one of the village huts which is a frequent target of raids by uncontacted...
A Madija Indian child walks from one of the village huts which is a frequent target of raids by uncontacted Indians in the village of Dsama, along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 11, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 11, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)

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April 03, 2014
Ashaninka Indian children run down the bank of the Envira river to greet a boat near their village of...
SIMPATIA, Brazil
Ashaninka Indian children run down the bank of the Envira river to greet a boat near their village of...
Ashaninka Indian children run down the bank of the Envira river to greet a boat near their village of Simpatia in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 13, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 13, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Ashaninka siblings pose for a photograph in their village, Simpatia, along the Envira river in Brazil's...
SIMPATIA, Brazil
Ashaninka siblings pose for a photograph in their village, Simpatia, along the Envira river in Brazil's...
Ashaninka siblings pose for a photograph in their village, Simpatia, along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 16, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 16, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Ashaninka Indian couple Poshe (L) and Biana talk about the kidnapping of their daughter Sawatxo, some...
SIMPATIA, Brazil
An Ashaninka Indian couple talk about the kidnapping of their daughter by uncontacted Indians, in their...
Ashaninka Indian couple Poshe (L) and Biana talk about the kidnapping of their daughter Sawatxo, some years ago, by uncontacted Indians, in their village Simpatia, along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 16, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 16, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Spiritual leaders of the Huni Kui Indian tribe perform a ceremony for a sacred samauma (silk-cotton)...
NOVO SEGREDO, Brazil
Spiritual leaders of the Huni Kui Indian tribe perform a ceremony for a sacred samauma tree outside the...
Spiritual leaders of the Huni Kui Indian tribe perform a ceremony for a sacred samauma (silk-cotton) tree outside the village of Novo Segredo along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 9, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 9, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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April 03, 2014
A spiritual leader (R) of the Huni Kui Indian tribe blows a herbal powder into the nose of a tribal member...
NOVO SEGREDO, Brazil
A spiritual leader of the Huni Kui Indian tribe blows a herbal powder into the nose of a tribal member...
A spiritual leader (R) of the Huni Kui Indian tribe blows a herbal powder into the nose of a tribal member during a ceremony outside the village of Novo Segredo along the Envira river of Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 9, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 9, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
A spiritual leader (R) of the Huni Kui Indian tribe performs a ceremony for a sacred samauma (silk-cotton)...
NOVO SEGREDO, Brazil
Spiritual leaders of the Huni Kui Indian tribe perform a ceremony for a sacred samauma tree outside the...
A spiritual leader (R) of the Huni Kui Indian tribe performs a ceremony for a sacred samauma (silk-cotton) tree outside the village of Novo Segredo along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 9, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 9, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
A Huni Kui Indian prepares a drink known as nixi pae or ayahuasca to use in a healing ritual in the village...
NOVO SEGREDO, Brazil
A Huni Kui Indian prepares a drink to use in a healing ritual in the village of Novo Segredo along the...
A Huni Kui Indian prepares a drink known as nixi pae or ayahuasca to use in a healing ritual in the village of Novo Segredo along the Envira river of Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 8, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 8, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Huni Kui Indians sit by the coffin of a newborn baby who died after being born on a boat on the Envira...
NOVO SEGREDO, Brazil
Huni Kui Indians sit by the coffin of a newborn baby who died after being born on a boat on the Envira...
Huni Kui Indians sit by the coffin of a newborn baby who died after being born on a boat on the Envira river as the mother tried to reach a hospital, in the village of Me Txanava in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 7, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 7, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
A Huni Kui Indian smokes herbs during a ritual in the village of Novo Segredo along the Envira river...
NOVO SEGREDO, Brazil
A Huni Kui Indian smokes herbs during a ritual in the village of Novo Segredo along the Envira river...
A Huni Kui Indian smokes herbs during a ritual in the village of Novo Segredo along the Envira river of Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 8, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 8, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE SEE GM1EA4J006201

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April 03, 2014
Huni Kui Indians perform a ritual in the village of Novo Segredo along the Envira river of Brazil's northwestern...
NOVO SEGREDO, Brazil
Huni Kui Indians perform a ritual in the village of Novo Segredo along the Envira river of Brazil's northwestern...
Huni Kui Indians perform a ritual in the village of Novo Segredo along the Envira river of Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 8, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 8, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
A view of the Shubua, or house of prayer, in the Huni Kui tribe's village of Me Txanava in Brazil's northwestern...
NOVO SEGREDO, Brazil
A view of the Shubua, or house of prayer, in the Huni Kui tribe's village of Me Txanava in Brazil's northwestern...
A view of the Shubua, or house of prayer, in the Huni Kui tribe's village of Me Txanava in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 6, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 6, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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April 03, 2014
The boat in which Ashaninka Indian leaders travelled to inspect the limits of their territory is tied...
NOVO SEGREDO, Brazil
The boat in which Ashaninka Indian leaders travelled to inspect the limits of their territory is tied...
The boat in which Ashaninka Indian leaders travelled to inspect the limits of their territory is tied to the bank of the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state March 15, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 15, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
An Ashaninka Indian family navigates the Envira river towards the town of Feijo in search of medical...
Acre, Brazil
An Ashaninka Indian family navigates the Envira river towards the town of Feijo in search of medical...
An Ashaninka Indian family navigates the Envira river towards the town of Feijo in search of medical care for a sick child, in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 10, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 10, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
A view from inside a river boat on the Envira river near the Huni Kui tribe's village of Me Txanava in...
Me Txanava, Brazil
A view from inside a river boat on the Envira river near the Huni Kui tribe's village of Me Txanava in...
A view from inside a river boat on the Envira river near the Huni Kui tribe's village of Me Txanava in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 8, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 8, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Madija Indians clean a caiman to eat, on a boat on the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state,...
Acre, Brazil
Madija Indians clean a caiman to eat, on a boat on the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state...
Madija Indians clean a caiman to eat, on a boat on the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 14, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 14, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
A view of the Ashaninka Indian village called Nova Floresta along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern...
Nova Floresta, Brazil
A view of the Ashaninka Indian village called Nova Floresta along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern...
A view of the Ashaninka Indian village called Nova Floresta along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 16, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 16, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
An Ashaninka Indian stands next to fresh footprints he found on the grounds of the former government...
Acre, Brazil
An Ashaninka Indian stands next to fresh footprints he found on the grounds of the former government...
An Ashaninka Indian stands next to fresh footprints he found on the grounds of the former government base called the Envira Front of Ethno-environmental Protection along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 14, 2014. Brazil's Indian affairs agency (FUNAI) reported to local media that the base was abandoned in 2011 after an attack by armed men from across the border in Peru. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 14, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
An Ashaninka Indian points his rifle across the Envira river on the grounds of a former government base...
Acre, Brazil
An Ashaninka Indian points his rifle across the Envira river on the grounds of a former government base...
An Ashaninka Indian points his rifle across the Envira river on the grounds of a former government base called the Envira Front of Ethno-environmental Protection in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 14, 2014. Brazil's Indian affairs agency (FUNAI) reported to local media that the base was abandoned in 2011 after an attack by armed men from across the border in Peru. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 14, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
An Ashaninka Indian holds a shotgun cartridge he found on the grounds of the former government base called...
Acre, Brazil
Ashaninka Indian, cacique (chief) Txate, walks between buildings of the former government base called...
An Ashaninka Indian holds a shotgun cartridge he found on the grounds of the former government base called the Envira Front of Ethno-environmental Protection along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 14, 2014. Brazil's Indian affairs agency (FUNAI) reported to local media that the base was abandoned in 2011 after an attack by armed men from across the border in Peru. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 14, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Ashaninka Indian cacique (chief) Txate stands inside a building of the former government base called...
Acre, Brazil
Ashaninka Indian cacique Txate stands inside a building of the former government base called the Envira...
Ashaninka Indian cacique (chief) Txate stands inside a building of the former government base called the Envira Front of Ethno-environmental Protection along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 14, 2014. Brazil's Indian affairs agency (FUNAI) reported to local media that the base was abandoned in 2011 after an attack by armed men from across the border in Peru. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 14, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Ashaninka Indian, cacique (chief) Txate, walks between buildings of the former government base called...
Acre, Brazil
Ashaninka Indian, cacique (chief) Txate, walks between buildings of the former government base called...
Ashaninka Indian, cacique (chief) Txate, walks between buildings of the former government base called the Envira Front of Ethno-environmental Protection along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 14, 2014. Brazil's Indian affairs agency (FUNAI) reported to local media that the base was abandoned in 2011 after an attack by armed men from across the border in Peru. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 14, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Ashaninka Indians hold a meeting to discuss their planned occupation of the former government base called...
Kokasul, Brazil
Ashaninka Indians hold a meeting to discuss their planned occupation of the former government base called...
Ashaninka Indians hold a meeting to discuss their planned occupation of the former government base called the Envira Front of Ethno-environmental Protection in Kokasul along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state March 16, 2014. Brazil's Indian affairs agency (FUNAI) reported to local media that the base was abandoned in 2011 after an attack by armed men from across the border in Peru. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 16, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Ashaninka Indians eat a meal at their home in the village of Kokasul along the Envira river in Brazil's...
Kokasul, Brazil
Ashaninka Indians eat a meal at their home in the village of Kokasul along the Envira river in Brazil's...
Ashaninka Indians eat a meal at their home in the village of Kokasul along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 16, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 16, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Ashaninka Indians pose for a photograph in the village of Kokasul along the Envira river in Brazil's...
Kokasul, Brazil
Ashaninka Indians pose for a photograph in the village of Kokasul along the Envira river in Brazil's...
Ashaninka Indians pose for a photograph in the village of Kokasul along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 16, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 16, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Ashaninka Indians pose for a photograph in the village of Kokasul along the Envira river in Brazil's...
Kokasul, Brazil
Ashaninka Indians pose for a photograph in the village of Kokasul along the Envira river in Brazil's...
Ashaninka Indians pose for a photograph in the village of Kokasul along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 16, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 16, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Ashaninka Indians pose for a photograph in the village of Kokasul along the Envira river in Brazil's...
Kokasul, Brazil
Ashaninka Indians pose for a photograph in the village of Kokasul along the Envira river in Brazil's...
Ashaninka Indians pose for a photograph in the village of Kokasul along the Envira river in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 16, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 16, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Binai, son of Cacique Omina of the Madija tribe, plays a ceramic flute made by uncontacted Indians which...
Acre, Brazil
Binai plays a ceramic flute made by uncontacted Indians in Igarape do Anjo in Brazil's northwestern Acre...
Binai, son of Cacique Omina of the Madija tribe, plays a ceramic flute made by uncontacted Indians which his father found and gave to him, in Igarape do Anjo in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 12, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 12, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
A ceramic flute made by uncontacted Indians sits on a table after it was found by Cacique Omina of the...
Igarape do Anjo, Brazil
A ceramic flute made by uncontacted Indians sits on a table after it was found by Cacique Omina of the...
A ceramic flute made by uncontacted Indians sits on a table after it was found by Cacique Omina of the Madija tribe, in the village called Igarape do Anjo in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 12, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 12, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
An Ashaninka Indian named Uarenco kneels over the grave of his niece who his family buried along the...
Kokasul, Brazil
An Ashaninka Indian named Uarenco kneels over the grave of his niece in Brazil's northwestern Acre state...
An Ashaninka Indian named Uarenco kneels over the grave of his niece who his family buried along the banks of the Envira river two weeks earlier when she died as they navigated the river in search of medical help for her diarrhoea, in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 17, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 17, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
Ashaninka Indian cacique (chief) Txate observes his tribe's territory from a plane window in Brazil's...
Acre, Brazil
Ashaninka Indian cacique Txate observes his tribe's territory from a plane window in Brazil's northwestern...
Ashaninka Indian cacique (chief) Txate observes his tribe's territory from a plane window in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 25, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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April 03, 2014
A view of an area of deforested jungle inside the Ashaninka Indian territory in Brazil's northwestern...
Acre, Brazil
A view of an area of deforested jungle inside the Ashaninka Indian territory in Brazil's northwestern...
A view of an area of deforested jungle inside the Ashaninka Indian territory in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 25, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)

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March 28, 2014
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community...
XINANE RIVER, Brazil
Uncontacted Indians react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin near the Xinane river in Brazil's Acre State, near the border with Peru, March 25, 2014. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe, which shares territory with this tribe and other uncontacted ones, have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider the encroachment of these tribes on their own area, stating that the movement of other tribes is caused by pressure from illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 07 OF 07 OF A SERIES OF EXCLUSIVE PICTURES OF A TRIBE IN THE AMAZON BASIN WHO IS CONSIDERED TO BE UNCONTACTED BY ANTHROPOLOGISTS. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH "AMAZON TRIBE"
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March 28, 2014
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community...
XINANE RIVER, Brazil
Uncontacted Indians react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin near the Xinane river in Brazil's Acre State, near the border with Peru, March 25, 2014. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe, which shares territory with this tribe and other uncontacted ones, have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider the encroachment of these tribes on their own area, stating that the movement of other tribes is caused by pressure from illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 04 OF 07 OF A SERIES OF EXCLUSIVE PICTURES OF A TRIBE IN THE AMAZON BASIN WHO IS CONSIDERED TO BE UNCONTACTED BY ANTHROPOLOGISTS. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH "AMAZON TRIBE"
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March 28, 2014
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community...
XINANE RIVER, Brazil
Uncontacted Indians react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin near the Xinane river in Brazil's Acre State, near the border with Peru, March 25, 2014. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe, which shares territory with this tribe and other uncontacted ones, have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider the encroachment of these tribes on their own area, stating that the movement of other tribes is caused by pressure from illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 03 OF 07 OF A SERIES OF EXCLUSIVE PICTURES OF A TRIBE IN THE AMAZON BASIN WHO IS CONSIDERED TO BE UNCONTACTED BY ANTHROPOLOGISTS. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH "AMAZON TRIBE"
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March 28, 2014
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community...
XINANE RIVER, Brazil
Uncontacted Indians react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin near the Xinane river in Brazil's Acre State, near the border with Peru, March 25, 2014. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe, which shares territory with this tribe and other uncontacted ones, have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider the encroachment of these tribes on their own area, stating that the movement of other tribes is caused by pressure from illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 06 OF 07 OF A SERIES OF EXCLUSIVE PICTURES OF A TRIBE IN THE AMAZON BASIN WHO IS CONSIDERED TO BE UNCONTACTED BY ANTHROPOLOGISTS. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH "AMAZON TRIBE"
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March 28, 2014
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community...
XINANE RIVER, Brazil
Uncontacted Indians react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin near the Xinane river in Brazil's Acre State, near the border with Peru, March 25, 2014. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe, which shares territory with this tribe and other uncontacted ones, have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider the encroachment of these tribes on their own area, stating that the movement of other tribes is caused by pressure from illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 01 OF 07 OF A SERIES OF EXCLUSIVE PICTURES OF A TRIBE IN THE AMAZON BASIN WHO IS CONSIDERED TO BE UNCONTACTED BY ANTHROPOLOGISTS. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH "AMAZON TRIBE"
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March 28, 2014
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community...
XINANE RIVER, Brazil
Uncontacted Indians react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin near the Xinane river in Brazil's Acre State, near the border with Peru, March 25, 2014. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe, which shares territory with this tribe and other uncontacted ones, have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider the encroachment of these tribes on their own area, stating that the movement of other tribes is caused by pressure from illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 02 OF 07 OF A SERIES OF EXCLUSIVE PICTURES OF A TRIBE IN THE AMAZON BASIN WHO IS CONSIDERED TO BE UNCONTACTED BY ANTHROPOLOGISTS. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH "AMAZON TRIBE"
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March 28, 2014
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community...
XINANE RIVER, Brazil
Uncontacted Indians react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin
Indians who are considered uncontacted by anthropologists react to a plane flying over their community in the Amazon basin near the Xinane river in Brazil's Acre State, near the border with Peru, March 25, 2014. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe, which shares territory with this tribe and other uncontacted ones, have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider the encroachment of these tribes on their own area, stating that the movement of other tribes is caused by pressure from illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 05 OF 07 OF A SERIES OF EXCLUSIVE PICTURES OF A TRIBE IN THE AMAZON BASIN WHO IS CONSIDERED TO BE UNCONTACTED BY ANTHROPOLOGISTS. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH "AMAZON TRIBE"
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April 03, 2014
The Xinane river runs through Ashaninka Indian territory in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 25,...
Acre, Brazil
The Xinane river runs through Ashaninka Indian territory in Brazil's northwestern Acre state
The Xinane river runs through Ashaninka Indian territory in Brazil's northwestern Acre state, March 25, 2014. Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The "Bravos," or "Braves," as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. Picture taken March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST)

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