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Highlight Edit

RTR49YCE
After The Deluge - 13 Oct 2014
Click here for a Full Edit

Topcic Polje was the scene of devastation almost six months ago, after the heaviest rainfall in more than a century caused rivers to burst their banks, swept away roads and buried homes in meters of mud and debris.

The village was at the centre of the devastation and Reuters photographer Dado Ruvic revisited the same locations he shot in May to show the contrast, as locals continued the cleanup.
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IF3
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows a dog sits on a flood-damaged basketball court during floods May 20, 2014 (top)...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows a dog sits on a flood-damaged basketball court during floods May 20, 2014 and...
A combination photo shows a dog sits on a flood-damaged basketball court during floods May 20, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IG6
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows people carrying their belongings as they evacuate from their flooded house...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows people carrying their belongings as they evacuate from their flooded house...
A combination photo shows people carrying their belongings as they evacuate from their flooded house during floods May 16, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IFZ
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows people evacuating from their flooded houses during floods May 16, 2014 (top)...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows people evacuating from their flooded houses during floods May 16, 2014 and...
A combination photo shows people evacuating from their flooded houses during floods May 16, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IFK
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows people walking past a damaged electric pole during floods May 20, 2014 (top)...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows people walking past a damaged electric pole during floods May 20, 2014 and...
A combination photo shows people walking past a damaged electric pole during floods May 20, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IAQ
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows Fata Kovacevic reacting near her flood-damaged house during floods May 20,...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows Fata Kovacevic reacting near her flood-damaged house during floods May 20,...
A combination photo shows Fata Kovacevic reacting near her flood-damaged house during floods May 20, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IF1
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows Asim Skopljak walking on a street during floods May 16, 2014 (top) and the...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows Asim Skopljak walking on a street during floods May 16, 2014 and the same place...
A combination photo shows Asim Skopljak walking on a street during floods May 16, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IAO
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows a man carrying belongings recovered from his house during floods May 20, 2014...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows a man carrying belongings recovered from his house during floods May 20, 2014...
A combination photo shows a man carrying belongings recovered from his house during floods May 20, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IAW
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows Adin Osmanovic posing in front of his flood-damaged house during floods May...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows Adin Osmanovic posing in front of his flood-damaged house during floods May...
A combination photo shows Adin Osmanovic posing in front of his flood-damaged house during floods May 20, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014, in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IEY
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows Asim Skopljak talking on a mobile phone as he walks near a car stranded during...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows Asim Skopljak talking on a mobile phone as he walks near a car stranded during...
A combination photo shows Asim Skopljak talking on a mobile phone as he walks near a car stranded during floods May 16, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IA6
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows Topcic Polje during floods May 20, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows Topcic Polje during and after floods
A combination photo shows Topcic Polje during floods May 20, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IEG
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows Asim Skopljak standing on a street that was hit by floods during floods May...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows Asim Skopljak standing on a street that was hit by floods during floods May...
A combination photo shows Asim Skopljak standing on a street that was hit by floods during floods May 16, 2014 (top) and the same place on after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49ICB
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family changing his boots during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family changing his boots during floods May 31, 2014 and the same...
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family changing his boots during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49ICT
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows the family photo of the Kovacevic family in the mud during floods May 31, 2014...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows the family photo of the Kovacevic family in the mud during floods May 31, 2014...
A combination photo shows the family photo of the Kovacevic family in the mud during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place on grass after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IAN
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during and after floods in Topcic Polje
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IAM
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during and after floods in Topcic Polje
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49ICV
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows members of the Kovacevic family clearing mud away from the kitchen in their...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows members of the Kovacevic family clearing mud away from the kitchen in their...
A combination photo shows members of the Kovacevic family clearing mud away from the kitchen in their flood-damaged home during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IC3
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows a member of the Kovacevic family clearing mud inside his home during floods...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows a member of the Kovacevic family clearing mud inside his home during floods...
A combination photo shows a member of the Kovacevic family clearing mud inside his home during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA=ELECTION/
RTR49IDR
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows resident Zehid Kovacevic cleaning mud from the inside of his home during floods...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows resident Zehid Kovacevic cleaning mud from the inside of his home during floods...
A combination photo shows resident Zehid Kovacevic cleaning mud from the inside of his home during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IAJ
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during and after floods in Topcic Polje
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IBU
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows a member of the Kovacevic family clearing mud inside his home during floods...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows a member of the Kovacevic family clearing mud inside his home during floods...
A combination photo shows a member of the Kovacevic family clearing mud inside his home during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IAL
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during and after floods in Topcic Polje
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IAI
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during and after floods in Topcic Polje
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
BOSNIA-ELECTION/
RTR49IAK
October 09, 2014
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place...
TOPCIC POLJE, Bosnia and Herzegovina
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during and after floods in Topcic Polje
A combination photo shows Kovacevic family house during floods May 31, 2014 (top) and the same place after floods October 8, 2014 in Topcic Polje. Bosnia's 3.3 million voters will choose a new political elite across six layers of government on October 12, 2014, in an election that, had it happened a few months ago, might have been a catalyst for change. But hopes that civil unrest in February would usher in a brighter future for a country riven by corruption and ethnic and ideological divisions have been all but extinguished in the aftermath of devastating floods that struck three months later. Senahida Kovacevic, whose village, Topcic Polje, was wiped off the map during the floods, says she has spent every day since mid-May in rubber boots, clearing her home of the mud that buried it during the worst rains to hit Bosnia in more than a century. From the 800 million euros ($1 billion) in aid pledged by international donors to help the country recover, 47-year-old Kovacevic, her mother and the three brothers she lives with received a couple of doors and windows, which didn't fit. Complaints about the misuse of foreign flood aid are rife, sharpening the perception of a corrupt political elite that has left would-be voters disillusioned and despairing of change almost 20 years after the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war. To match Preview BOSNIA-ELECTION/ REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
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