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Japan's Atomic Bomb Survivors - 12 Apr 2015 
As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. 
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
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April 12, 2015 
Hiroshi Harada, a 75-year-old atomic bomb survivor and former head of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum,... 
Hiroshima, Japan 
Harada, an atomic bomb survivor, poses for a photograph in front of a cenotaph for the victims of the... 
Hiroshi Harada, a 75-year-old atomic bomb survivor and former head of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, poses for a photograph in front of a cenotaph for the victims of the 1945 atomic bomb, in the Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 26, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 26, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYPX 
April 12, 2015 
Makiko Kato, an 85-year-old atomic bomb survivor, poses in front of pictures of survivors' activities... 
Hiroshima, Japan 
Kato, an atomic bomb survivor, poses in front of pictures of survivors' activities to convey the experience... 
Makiko Kato, an 85-year-old atomic bomb survivor, poses in front of pictures of survivors' activities to convey the experience of being witness to the horrors of atomic bombs to young people, at Funairi Mutsumi-en, a nursing home for atomic bomb survivors, in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 27, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 27, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYQE 
April 12, 2015 
Hiroshi Harada, a 75-year-old atomic bomb survivor and former head of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum,... 
Hiroshima, Japan 
Harada, an atomic bomb survivor and former head of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, stands near a... 
Hiroshi Harada, a 75-year-old atomic bomb survivor and former head of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, stands near a red ball indicating where the atomic bomb exploded above Hiroshima city, at the meseum in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 26, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 26, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
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April 12, 2015 
Shigeo Ito, an 84-year-old an atomic bomb survivor, displays a 1944 family photo on a laptop computer... 
HIGASHIHIROSHIMA, Japan 
Atomic bomb survivor Ito displays a 1944 family photo on a laptop computer that shows his late sister... 
Shigeo Ito, an 84-year-old an atomic bomb survivor, displays a 1944 family photo on a laptop computer that shows his late sister Yuki (rear, 3rd L), who was killed by the bomb, as he demostrates sharing the experience of being witness to the horrors of atomic bombs to young people, at an exhibition about the 1945 atomic bombings in Higashihiroshima, western Japan, March 27, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 27, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYPU 
April 12, 2015 
Hiroshi Harada, a 75-year-old atomic bomb survivor and former head of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum,... 
Hiroshima, Japan 
Harada, an atomic bomb survivor, poses for a photograph in front of a cenotaph for the victims of the... 
Hiroshi Harada, a 75-year-old atomic bomb survivor and former head of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, poses for a photograph in front of a cenotaph for the victims of the 1945 atomic bomb, in the Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 26, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 26, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYPZ 
April 12, 2015 
Fumiaki Kajiya, a 76-year-old atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, speaks during an interview... 
Hiroshima, Japan 
Fumiaki Kajiya, an atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, speaks during an interview with Reuters... 
Fumiaki Kajiya, a 76-year-old atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, speaks during an interview with Reuters at his home in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 27, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 27, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYQ2 
April 12, 2015 
Hiroshi Harada, a 75-year-old atomic bomb survivor and former head of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum,... 
Hiroshima, Japan 
Hiroshi Harada, an atomic bomb survivor and former head of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, walks... 
Hiroshi Harada, a 75-year-old atomic bomb survivor and former head of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, walks on Motoyasu Bridge near the Atomic Bomb Dome in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 26, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 26, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYPY 
April 12, 2015 
Fumiaki Kajiya, a 76-year-old atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, demonstrates how he uses... 
Hiroshima, Japan 
Fumiaki Kajiya, an atomic bomb survivor, demonstrates how he uses hand-drawn "picture shows" to share... 
Fumiaki Kajiya, a 76-year-old atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, demonstrates how he uses hand-drawn "picture shows" to share the experience of being witness to the horrors of atomic bombs to children at his home in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 27, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 27, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYQ0 
April 12, 2015 
Fumiaki Kajiya, a 76-year-old atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, poses for a photograph... 
Hiroshima, Japan 
Fumiaki Kajiya, an atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, poses for a photograph at his home... 
Fumiaki Kajiya, a 76-year-old atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, poses for a photograph as he demonstrates how he uses hand-drawn "picture shows" to share the experience of being witness to the horrors of atomic bombs to children at his home in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 27, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 27, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYPW 
April 12, 2015 
Shigeo Ito, an 84-year-old an atomic bomb survivor, speaks during an interview with Reuters at an exhibition... 
HIGASHIHIROSHIMA, Japan 
Atomic bomb survivor Shigeo Ito speaks during an interview with Reuters at an exhibition about the 1945... 
Shigeo Ito, an 84-year-old an atomic bomb survivor, speaks during an interview with Reuters at an exhibition about the 1945 atomic bombings in Higashihiroshima, western Japan, March 27, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 27, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYQ1 
April 12, 2015 
Fumiaki Kajiya, a 76-year-old atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, looks towards the city... 
Hiroshima, Japan 
Fumiaki Kajiya, an atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, looks towards the city center from... 
Fumiaki Kajiya, a 76-year-old atomic bomb survivor and retired school teacher, looks towards the city center from the street in front of his home in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 27, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 27, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYPV 
April 12, 2015 
Makiko Kato, an 85-year-old atomic bomb survivor, holds a book recording survivors' experience of being... 
Hiroshima, Japan 
Kato, an atomic bomb survivor, holds a book recording survivors' experience at Funairi Mutsumi-en in... 
Makiko Kato, an 85-year-old atomic bomb survivor, holds a book recording survivors' experience of being witness to the horrors of atomic bombs for future generations at Funairi Mutsumi-en, a nursing home for atomic bomb survivors, in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 27, 2015. As the 70th anniversary of the world's first nuclear attack nears, many survivors still find it too painful to talk about. But with their ranks dwindling, others are determined to pass on their experiences to younger generations. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 27, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYQF 
April 12, 2015 
Paper cranes, with one bearing a written message "Peace First!!!", are collected at an exhibition about... 
HIGASHIHIROSHIMA, Japan 
Paper cranes, with one bearing a written message "Peace First!!!", are collected at an exhibition about... 
Paper cranes, with one bearing a written message "Peace First!!!", are collected at an exhibition about the 1945 atomic bombings in Higashihiroshima, western Japan, March 26, 2015. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 26, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYQ3 
April 12, 2015 
Scaffolding surrounds the Atomic Bomb Dome during maintenance work in Hiroshima, western Japan, March... 
Hiroshima, Japan 
Scaffolding surrounds the Atomic Bomb Dome during maintenance work in Hiroshima 
Scaffolding surrounds the Atomic Bomb Dome during maintenance work in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 26, 2015. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 26, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYQC 
April 12, 2015 
Visitors look at photographs and artifacts from the destruction caused by the 1945 atomic bombing, at... 
Hiroshima, Japan 
Visitors look at photographs and artifacts from the destruction caused by the 1945 atomic bombing, at... 
Visitors look at photographs and artifacts from the destruction caused by the 1945 atomic bombing, at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 26, 2015. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 26, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN-HIROSHIMA/
RTR4WYQ6 
April 12, 2015 
A family looks at a photograph of the mushroom cloud of the atomic bomb blast at Hiroshima Peace Memorial... 
Hiroshima, Japan 
A family looks at a photograph of the mushroom cloud of the atomic bomb blast at Hiroshima Peace Memorial... 
A family looks at a photograph of the mushroom cloud of the atomic bomb blast at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima, western Japan, March 27, 2015. A U.S. bomber dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 by the end of the year, out of the 350,000 who lived in the city. The city still has some 60,000 survivors but their average age is approaching 80. Picture taken March 27, 2015. REUTERS/Issei Kato
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