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Immigration

RTX118RT
Convent Squatters Facing Expulsion in Belgium - 19 Sep 2013
Images showing immigrants living in an abandoned convent known as Gesu in Brussels. Some 160 squatters including 60 children
may face expulsion when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started. Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the
current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed.
BELGIUM/
RTX118FP
July 01, 2013
Sergio Aruajo from Brazil sits in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, where he has lived at for two...
Brussels, Belgium
A man from Brazil sits in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, where he has lived at for two years, in...
Sergio Aruajo from Brazil sits in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, where he has lived at for two years, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started. Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX13R3K
September 19, 2013
Residents of the "Gesu Squat," an abandoned convent, listen to officials in Brussels, September 18, 2013....
Brussels, Belgium
Residents of the "Gesu Squat" listen to officials in Brussels
Residents of the "Gesu Squat," an abandoned convent, listen to officials in Brussels, September 18, 2013. The giant building, once a church and a convent, may be turned into a hotel and luxury apartments should a project proposed by a Swiss developer get the green light, leading to the expulsion of all its residents. Picture taken September 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX13R3I
September 19, 2013
Bartolomie Mroc (L) from Slovakia and his partner Eva Dunova, both who have been living in the abandoned...
Brussels, Belgium
Bartolomie Mroc and partner shows a photo of their daughter at the "Gesu Squat" in Brussels
Bartolomie Mroc (L) from Slovakia and his partner Eva Dunova, both who have been living in the abandoned convent called "Gesu Squat" for the last three years, shows a photo of Veronika, one of their nine children, during a meeting with a volunteer in a room transformed as their apartment in Brussels September 18, 2013. The giant building, once a church and a convent, may be turned into a hotel and luxury apartments should a project proposed by a Swiss developer get the green light, leading to the expulsion of all its residents. Picture taken September 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX13R35
September 19, 2013
Mustapha Mbarki from Casablanca, Morocco stands in a room transformed into a workshop at the "Gesu Squat",...
Brussels, Belgium
Mbarki from Morocco stands in a workshop at the "Gesu Squat" where he has been living in for the past...
Mustapha Mbarki from Casablanca, Morocco stands in a room transformed into a workshop at the "Gesu Squat", an abandoned convent, where he has been living in for the past year in Brussels September 18, 2013. The giant building, once a church and a convent, may be turned into a hotel and luxury apartments should a project proposed by a Swiss developer get the green light, leading to the expulsion of all its residents. Picture taken September 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX13R31
September 19, 2013
Nassar Khelil from Oujda, Morocco sits in his room at the "Gesu Squat," an abandoned convent, where he...
Brussels, Belgium
Khelil from Morocco sits in his room at the "Gesu Squat" where he has been living for the past month...
Nassar Khelil from Oujda, Morocco sits in his room at the "Gesu Squat," an abandoned convent, where he has been living for the past month in Brussels September 18, 2013. The giant building, once a church and a convent, may be turned into a hotel and luxury apartments should a project proposed by a Swiss developer get the green light, leading to the expulsion of all its residents. Picture taken September 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX13R4A
September 19, 2013
The courtyard of the "Gesu Squat," an abandoned convent, is seen through broken windows in Brussels September...
Brussels, Belgium
The courtyard of the "Gesu Squat" is seen through broken windows in Brussels
The courtyard of the "Gesu Squat," an abandoned convent, is seen through broken windows in Brussels September 18, 2013. The giant building, once a church and a convent, may be turned into a hotel and luxury apartments should a project proposed by a Swiss developer get the green light, leading to the expulsion of all its residents. Picture taken September 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX118FN
July 01, 2013
Sergio Aruajo from Brazil poses for Reuters in his room in a convent known as Gesu, where he has lived...
Brussels, Belgium
A man from Brazil poses for Reuters in his room in a convent known as Gesu, where he has lived at for...
Sergio Aruajo from Brazil poses for Reuters in his room in a convent known as Gesu, where he has lived at for two years, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started. Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX118FB
July 01, 2013
Aitor Castelruiz, 41, from San Sebastian, Spain sits in his room with his dogs Hipy and Tigret in the...
Brussels, Belgium
A man from San Sebastian, Spain sits in his room with his dogs in the abandoned convent known as Gesu,...
Aitor Castelruiz, 41, from San Sebastian, Spain sits in his room with his dogs Hipy and Tigret in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, where he has lived in for a year, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead.
Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started.
Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY POVERTY IMMIGRATION REAL ESTATE BUSINESS)
BELGIUM/
RTX118FK
July 01, 2013
Eugenia Pizarro Iglesias, 24, from Spain plays with her son Youssef, 18 months old, in their room in...
Brussels, Belgium
A woman from Spain plays with her son in their room in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels...
Eugenia Pizarro Iglesias, 24, from Spain plays with her son Youssef, 18 months old, in their room in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, where they have lived at for eight months, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started.
Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX118GO
July 01, 2013
Residents sit in the courtyard of the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some...
Brussels, Belgium
Residents sit in the courtyard of the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels
Residents sit in the courtyard of the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started. Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX118GB
July 01, 2013
Children play in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters...
Brussels, Belgium
Children play in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels
Children play in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started. Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX118GJ
July 01, 2013
A resident cleans a corridor in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some...
Brussels, Belgium
A resident cleans a corridor in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels
A resident cleans a corridor in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started. Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX118GF
July 01, 2013
Children look through a broken window in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013.
...
Brussels, Belgium
Children look through a broken window in the abandoned convent known as Gesu in Brussels
Children look through a broken window in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013.
Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started. Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX118GG
July 01, 2013
A boy plays in a corridor in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160...
Brussels, Belgium
A boy plays in a corridor in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels
A boy plays in a corridor in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started. Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX118FE
July 01, 2013
A girl drinks water in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters...
Brussels, Belgium
A girl drinks water in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels
A girl drinks water in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started.
Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY IMMIGRATION REAL ESTATE BUSINESS)
BELGIUM/
RTX118FH
July 01, 2013
A woman walks up the stairs in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some...
Brussels, Belgium
A woman walks up the stairs in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels
A woman walks up the stairs in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started.
Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY IMMIGRATION REAL ESTATE BUSINESS)
BELGIUM/
RTX118G3
July 01, 2013
Residents listen to officials during a visit by authorities in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in...
Brussels, Belgium
Residents listen to officials during a visit by authorities in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in...
Residents listen to officials during a visit by authorities in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started. Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX118F6
July 01, 2013
Children look through a broken window in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013....
Brussels, Belgium
Children look through a broken window in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels
Children look through a broken window in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started. Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SOCIETY POVERTY IMMIGRATION REAL ESTATE BUSINESS)
BELGIUM/
RTX118FU
July 01, 2013
Residents remove rubbish from the courtyard of the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April...
Brussels, Belgium
Residents remove rubbish from the courtyard of the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels
Residents remove rubbish from the courtyard of the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started. Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
BELGIUM/
RTX118FJ
July 01, 2013
Children play in the courtyard in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some...
Brussels, Belgium
Children play in the courtyard in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels
Children play in the courtyard in the abandoned convent known as Gesu, in Brussels April 18, 2013. Some 160 squatters including 60 children may face expulsion in Brussels when a 90-million-euro project by a Swiss developer to turn their dwellings into a luxury hotel and apartments gets the go ahead. Only a few metro stops from the European institutions and the city's touristic highlights, the Gesu church and convent have remained vacant for decades and were bought by Swiss developer Rosebud Heritage in 2007, who agreed that the property could be used as a squat until the works started.
Most of the residents of the squat are immigrants coming from the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and Morocco, looking to settle in Belgium. Some families have lived in Belgium for many years and some have stayed in the squat for months. With monthly rents at the squat currently at about 25 euros per adult, it is unlikely that the current residents will be able to move into the new apartments once they are completed. Picture taken April 18, 2013. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
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