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Labour

RTX123BP
Industry's Victims in Bangladesh - 29 Jul 2013
Images from Bangladesh of workers labouring in hazardous conditions in various industries from ship breaking
to stone crushing to cigarette making as well as the garment industry. Attention has been focused on lax safety
standards in Bangladesh's booming garment industry since the disaster at Rana Plaza, the building which collapsed in April, killing more than 1,100 workers. At least five different Bangladesh agencies have dispatched teams to start inspecting the country’s thousands of garment factories, but there has been little coordination between them.
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234K
July 28, 2013
Marium, 16, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, lies on a...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Marium, 16, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, lies on a...
Marium, 16, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, lies on a bed at the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation (NITOR) in Dhaka July 4, 2013. A rescue worker had to amputate a part of her arm to save her. The April 24 collapse of the Rana Plaza complex, built on swampy ground outside Dhaka with several illegal floors, killed 1,132 workers and focused international attention on sometimes lax safety standards in Bangladesh's booming garment industry. At least five different Bangladesh agencies have dispatched teams to start inspecting the country’s thousands of garment factories, but there has been little coordination between them. More than four million people, mostly women, work in Bangladesh's clothing sector, which is the country’s largest employment generator, with annual exports worth $21 billion. Picture taken July 4, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 06 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX12354
July 28, 2013
A child packs up cigarettes in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh...
HARAGACH, Bangladesh
A child packs up cigarettes in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district
A child packs up cigarettes in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 13, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes “many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty.” A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 24 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX12350
July 28, 2013
A child fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory...
HARAGACH, Bangladesh
A child fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory...
A child fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 13, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes “many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty.” A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 19 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX12358
July 28, 2013
Rasheda, 15, who used to work for Abul Khair Steel Mills Ltd, stands outside a ward of the National Institute...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Rasheda, 15, who used to work for Abul Khair Steel Mills Ltd, stands outside a ward of the National Institute...
Rasheda, 15, who used to work for Abul Khair Steel Mills Ltd, stands outside a ward of the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation in Dhaka, July 4, 2013. Rasheda said she lost one of her hands and another one has been critically injured in an accident while working for the steel company in Chittagong, Bangladesh. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 4, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 28 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234F
July 28, 2013
Workers sort clothes at a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar, Bangladesh...
Savar, Bangladesh
Workers sort clothes at a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar
Workers sort clothes at a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar, Bangladesh June 16, 2013. The April 24 collapse of the Rana Plaza complex, built on swampy ground outside Dhaka with several illegal floors, killed 1,132 workers and focused international attention on sometimes lax safety standards in Bangladesh's booming garment industry. At least five different Bangladesh agencies have dispatched teams to start inspecting the country’s thousands of garment factories, but there has been little coordination between them. More than four million people, mostly women, work in Bangladesh's clothing sector, which is the country’s largest employment generator, with annual exports worth $21 billion. Picture taken June 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 01 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234E
July 28, 2013
A worker carries a stack of clothes in a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar,...
Savar, Bangladesh
A worker carries a stack of clothes in a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar...
A worker carries a stack of clothes in a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar, Bangladesh June 16, 2013. The April 24 collapse of the Rana Plaza complex, built on swampy ground outside Dhaka with several illegal floors, killed 1,132 workers and focused international attention on sometimes lax safety standards in Bangladesh's booming garment industry. At least five different Bangladesh agencies have dispatched teams to start inspecting the country’s thousands of garment factories, but there has been little coordination between them. More than four million people, mostly women, work in Bangladesh's clothing sector, which is the country’s largest employment generator, with annual exports worth $21 billion. Picture taken June 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 02 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234G
July 28, 2013
A stack of clothes is seen at a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar, Bangladesh...
Savar, Bangladesh
A stack of clothes is seen at a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar
A stack of clothes is seen at a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar, Bangladesh June 16, 2013. The April 24 collapse of the Rana Plaza complex, built on swampy ground outside Dhaka with several illegal floors, killed 1,132 workers and focused international attention on sometimes lax safety standards in Bangladesh's booming garment industry. At least five different Bangladesh agencies have dispatched teams to start inspecting the country's thousands of garment factories, but there has been little coordination between them. More than four million people, mostly women, work in Bangladesh's clothing sector, which is the country's largest employment generator, with annual exports worth $21 billion. Picture taken June 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 03 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234N
July 28, 2013
Mustafizur (L) tries to comfort his wife Rebecca, 20, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Mustafizur tries to comfort his wife Rebecca, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed...
Mustafizur (L) tries to comfort his wife Rebecca, 20, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, at the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation (NITOR) in Dhaka July 3, 2013. The April 24 collapse of the Rana Plaza complex, built on swampy ground outside Dhaka with several illegal floors, killed 1,132 workers and focused international attention on sometimes lax safety standards in Bangladesh's booming garment industry. At least five different Bangladesh agencies have dispatched teams to start inspecting the country’s thousands of garment factories, but there has been little coordination between them. More than four million people, mostly women, work in Bangladesh's clothing sector, which is the country’s largest employment generator, with annual exports worth $21 billion. Picture taken July 3, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 07 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234M
July 28, 2013
Karuna Akter Lima, 20, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building,...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Karuna Akter Lima, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, sits...
Karuna Akter Lima, 20, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, sits on a bed at the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation (NITOR) in Dhaka July 4, 2013. The April 24 collapse of the Rana Plaza complex, built on swampy ground outside Dhaka with several illegal floors, killed 1,132 workers and focused international attention on sometimes lax safety standards in Bangladesh's booming garment industry. At least five different Bangladesh agencies have dispatched teams to start inspecting the country’s thousands of garment factories, but there has been little coordination between them. More than four million people, mostly women, work in Bangladesh's clothing sector, which is the country’s largest employment generator, with annual exports worth $21 billion. Picture taken July 4, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY) ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 08 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234J
July 28, 2013
Jesmin, a 25-year-old survivor from the collapsed Rana Plaza Building, lies on a bed at the Centre for...
Savar, Bangladesh
Jesmin, a survivor from the collapsed Rana Plaza Building, lies on a bed at the Centre for the Rehabilitation...
Jesmin, a 25-year-old survivor from the collapsed Rana Plaza Building, lies on a bed at the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed (CRP) in Savar, Bangladesh June 4, 2013. Jesmin suffers from a spinal injury and is waiting for surgery.The April 24 collapse of the Rana Plaza complex, built on swampy ground outside Dhaka with several illegal floors, killed 1,132 workers and focused international attention on sometimes lax safety standards in Bangladesh's booming garment industry. At least five different Bangladesh agencies have dispatched teams to start inspecting the country’s thousands of garment factories, but there has been little coordination between them. More than four million people, mostly women, work in Bangladesh's clothing sector, which is the country’s largest employment generator, with annual exports worth $21 billion. Picture taken June 4, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 05 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234H
July 28, 2013
A relative pours water on 25-year-old Rojina's head at the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed...
Savar, Bangladesh
A relative pours water on 25-year-old Rojina's head at the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed...
A relative pours water on 25-year-old Rojina's head at the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed (CRP) in Savar, Bangladesh June 4, 2013. Rescue workers, who pulled Rojina from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, had to amputate part of her arm to rescue her. The April 24 collapse of the Rana Plaza complex, built on swampy ground outside Dhaka with several illegal floors, killed 1,132 workers and focused international attention on sometimes lax safety standards in Bangladesh's booming garment industry. At least five different Bangladesh agencies have dispatched teams to start inspecting the country’s thousands of garment factories, but there has been little coordination between them. More than four million people, mostly women, work in Bangladesh's clothing sector, which is the country’s largest employment generator, with annual exports worth $21 billion. Picture taken June 4, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 04 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234Q
July 28, 2013
A worker helps his colleague to lift a bucket of limestone as they work in a stone crushing factory at...
BURIMARI, Bangladesh
A worker helps his colleague to lift a bucket of limestone as they work in a stone crushing factory at...
A worker helps his colleague to lift a bucket of limestone as they work in a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh July 9, 2013. The stone crushing industry in the Burimari land port area of Lalmonirhat, in the north of Bangladesh, produces lime powder for various industrial purposes. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, those working in the industry run the risk of contracting silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust. A researcher from the organization said that at least 18 workers in the Burimari area had died of complex silicosis over the last four years. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 10 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234O
July 28, 2013
A man works in a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh July 9, 2013....
BURIMARI, Bangladesh
A man works in a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district
A man works in a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh July 9, 2013. The stone crushing industry in the Burimari land port area of Lalmonirhat, in the north of Bangladesh, produces lime powder for various industrial purposes. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, those working in the industry run the risk of contracting silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust. A researcher from the organization said that at least 18 workers in the Burimari area had died of complex silicosis over the last four years. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 09 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234T
July 28, 2013
A worker's sandals are seen inside a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh...
BURIMARI, Bangladesh
A worker's sandals are seen inside a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district
A worker's sandals are seen inside a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh July 9, 2013. The stone crushing industry in the Burimari land port area of Lalmonirhat, in the north of Bangladesh, produces lime powder for various industrial purposes. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, those working in the industry run the risk of contracting silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust. A researcher from the organization said that at least 18 workers in the Burimari area had died of complex silicosis over the last four years. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 11 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234X
July 28, 2013
Ainul Huq, 55, (R) and Bulbul Hossain, 25, describe the condition of their lungs inside a village house...
BURIMARI, Bangladesh
Ainul Huq and Bulbul Hossain describe the condition of their lungs inside a village house in Burimari...
Ainul Huq, 55, (R) and Bulbul Hossain, 25, describe the condition of their lungs inside a village house in Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh July 9, 2013. According to Huq and Hossain, they are sufferers of silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust as they used to work in a stone crushing factory for few years. The stone crushing industry in the Burimari land port area of Lalmonirhat, in the north of Bangladesh, produces lime powder for various industrial purposes. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, those working in the industry run the risk of contracting silicosis. A researcher from the organization said that at least 18 workers in the Burimari area had died of complex silicosis over the last four years. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 15 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234W
July 28, 2013
Montu Mia, 40, describes the condition of his lungs inside his house in Burimari in Lalmonirhat district,...
BURIMARI, Bangladesh
Montu Mia describes the condition of his lungs inside his house in Burimari in Lalmonirhat district
Montu Mia, 40, describes the condition of his lungs inside his house in Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh July 9, 2013. Montu Mia says he suffers from silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by the inhalation of silica dust, as he used to work in a stone crushing factory for five years. The stone crushing industry in the Burimari land port area of Lalmonirhat, in the north of Bangladesh, produces lime powder for various industrial purposes. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, those working in the industry run the risk of contracting silicosis. A researcher from the organization said that at least 18 workers in the Burimari area had died of complex silicosis over the last four years. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 16 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234V
July 28, 2013
Montu Mia, 40, lies on a bed as he describes the condition of his lungs inside his house in Burimari...
BURIMARI, Bangladesh
Montu Mia lies on a bed as he describes the condition of his lungs inside his house in Burimari in Lalmonirhat...
Montu Mia, 40, lies on a bed as he describes the condition of his lungs inside his house in Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh July 9, 2013. Montu Mia says he suffers from silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust as he used to work in a stone crushing factory for five years. The stone crushing industry in the Burimari land port area of Lalmonirhat, in the north of Bangladesh, produces lime powder for various industrial purposes. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, those working in the industry run the risk of contracting silicosis. A researcher from the organization said that at least 18 workers in the Burimari area had died of complex silicosis over the last four years. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 14 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234U
July 28, 2013
Kamal Hossain, 28, sits on a bed as he describes the condition of his lungs inside his house at Burimari...
BURIMARI, Bangladesh
Kamal Hossain sits on a bed as he describes the condition of his lungs inside his house at Burimari in...
Kamal Hossain, 28, sits on a bed as he describes the condition of his lungs inside his house at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh July 9, 2013. Hossain says he suffers from silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by the inhalation of silica dust as he used to work in a stone crushing factory for five years. The stone crushing industry in the Burimari land port area of Lalmonirhat, in the north of Bangladesh, produces lime powder for various industrial purposes. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, those working in the industry run the risk of contracting silicosis. A researcher from the organization said that at least 18 workers in the Burimari area had died of complex silicosis over the last four years. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 13 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234Z
July 28, 2013
A worker crushes locally grown tobacco in a grinding machine in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory at...
HARAGACH, Bangladesh
A worker crushes locally grown tobacco in a grinding machine in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory at...
A worker crushes locally grown tobacco in a grinding machine in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 11, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes “many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty.” A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 18 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234Y
July 28, 2013
Workers fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory...
HARAGACH, Bangladesh
Workers fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory...
Workers fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 13, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes “many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty.” A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 17 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX12351
July 28, 2013
Karim, 7, poses for a photograph as he works in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur...
HARAGACH, Bangladesh
Karim, 7, poses for a photograph as he works in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur...
Karim, 7, poses for a photograph as he works in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 13, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes “many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty.” A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 20 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX12353
July 28, 2013
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory...
HARAGACH, Bangladesh
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory...
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 11, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes “many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty.” A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 21 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX12352
July 28, 2013
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory...
HARAGACH, Bangladesh
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory...
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 11, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes “many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty.” A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 22 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX12355
July 28, 2013
Pari, 6, fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco as she works in a small bidi (cigarette)...
HARAGACH, Bangladesh
Pari, 6, fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco as she works in a small bidi (cigarette)...
Pari, 6, fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco as she works in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 11, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes “many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty.” A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 23 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1235D
July 28, 2013
Workers use a makeshift ladder to board a boat as they come back to shore after finishing work at a ship-breaking...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
Workers use a makeshift ladder to board a boat as they come back to shore after finishing work at a ship-breaking...
Workers use a makeshift ladder to board a boat as they come back to shore after finishing work at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 16, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km (12.4 miles), and environmental organisations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 31 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX12359
July 28, 2013
Fazal Uddin, 80, lies on a bed as he suffers from asthma, in Haragach, Rangpur district, Bangladesh July...
HARAGACH, Bangladesh
Fazal Uddin, 80, lies on a bed as he suffers from asthma, in Haragach, Rangpur district
Fazal Uddin, 80, lies on a bed as he suffers from asthma, in Haragach, Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 11, 2013. According to Uddin's family, he became sick as he used to work in a 'bidi' (cigarrette) factory for 8-10 years. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes “many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty.” A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 27 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX12357
July 28, 2013
A worker crushes locally grown tobacco with a grinding machine in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at...
HARAGACH, Bangladesh
A worker crushes locally grown tobacco with a grinding machine in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at...
A worker crushes locally grown tobacco with a grinding machine in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 13, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes “many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty.” A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 26 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX12356
July 28, 2013
A worker carries a bucket while he works in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district,...
HARAGACH, Bangladesh
A worker carries a bucket while he works in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district...
A worker carries a bucket while he works in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 13, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes “many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty.” A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 25 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1235A
July 28, 2013
Noor Alam, 23, a wounded worker, sits in his home near a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
Noor Alam, a wounded worker, sits in his home near a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong
Noor Alam, 23, a wounded worker, sits in his home near a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 17, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km (12.4 miles), and environmental organisations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 17, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 29 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1235B
July 28, 2013
A key hangs round the neck of a worker in a common residence near a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong,...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
A key hangs round the neck of a worker in a common residence near a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong
A key hangs round the neck of a worker in a common residence near a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 17, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km (12.4 miles), and environmental organisations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 17, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 30 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1235E
July 28, 2013
A worker welds part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 16, 2013. Bangladesh...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
A worker welds part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong
A worker welds part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 16, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km (12.4 miles), and environmental organisations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 33 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1235C
July 28, 2013
Workers disembark from a boat as they return from part of a wrecked ship after work at a ship-breaking...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
Workers disembark from a boat as they return from part of a wrecked ship after work at a ship-breaking...
Workers disembark from a boat as they return from part of a wrecked ship after work at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 16, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km (12.4 miles), and environmental organisations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 32 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1235F
July 28, 2013
A man works inside a wrecked section of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
A man works inside a wrecked section of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong
A man works inside a wrecked section of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 16, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km (12.4 miles), and environmental organisations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 34 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1235G
July 28, 2013
Workers carry a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 16, 2013. Bangladesh...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
Workers carry a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong
Workers carry a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 16, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km (12.4 miles), and environmental organisations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 35 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1234S
July 28, 2013
Momin Ali, 26, shows an x-ray film of his lungs inside his house at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district,...
BURIMARI, Bangladesh
Momin Ali, 26, shows an x-ray film of his lungs inside his house at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district
Momin Ali, 26, shows an x-ray film of his lungs inside his house at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh July 9, 2013. Ali says he suffers from silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust, as he used to work in a stone crushing factory for two and half years. The stone crushing industry in the Burimari land port area of Lalmonirhat, in the north of Bangladesh, produces lime powder for various industrial purposes. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, those working in the industry run the risk of contracting silicosis. A researcher from the organization said that at least 18 workers in the Burimari area had died of complex silicosis over the last four years. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 12 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
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