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RTX12ER3
From The Power Of The Toilet - 26 Jun 2013
SPAIN-BIOENERGY/
RTX1119J
June 26, 2013
Aqualia's All-gas project researchers Mara Laureano (R), 27, and Miled Morad, 33, talk after she collected...
CHICLANA DE LA FRONTERA, Spain
Aqualia's All-gas project researchers Laureano and Morad talk after she collected water samples with...
Aqualia's All-gas project researchers Mara Laureano (R), 27, and Miled Morad, 33, talk after she collected water samples with Imhoff cones from a tank at a waste-water treatment plant in Chiclana de la Frontera, near Cadiz, southern Spain June 6, 2013. The Spanish resort town with sprawling golf courses and tree-lined beaches has added another green site to its attractions: the world's first plant to convert sewage into clean energy. The facility in Chiclana de la Frontera on the southwest tip of Spain uses wastewater and sunlight to produce algae-based biofuel as part of a 12 million euro project to pursue alternative energies and reduce reliance on foreign oil. While industries such as breweries or paper mills have produced biogas from wastewater for their own energy needs, All-gas is the first to grow algae from sewage in a systematic way to produce a net export of bioenergy, including vehicle biofuel. Picture taken June 6, 2013. REUTERS/Jon Nazca (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SPAIN-BIOENERGY/
RTX1119L
June 26, 2013
Aqualia's All-gas project leader and director of innovation and technology Frank Rogalla (back R) points...
CHICLANA DE LA FRONTERA, Spain
Aqualia's All-gas project leader and director of innovation and technology Rogalla talks to researchers...
Aqualia's All-gas project leader and director of innovation and technology Frank Rogalla (back R) points to an informational poster as he talks to researchers at a waste-water treatment plant in Chiclana de la Frontera, near Cadiz, southern Spain June 6, 2013. The Spanish resort town with sprawling golf courses and tree-lined beaches has added another green site to its attractions: the world's first plant to convert sewage into clean energy. The facility in Chiclana de la Frontera on the southwest tip of Spain uses wastewater and sunlight to produce algae-based biofuel as part of a 12 million euro project to pursue alternative energies and reduce reliance on foreign oil. While industries such as breweries or paper mills have produced biogas from wastewater for their own energy needs, All-gas is the first to grow algae from sewage in a systematic way to produce a net export of bioenergy, including vehicle biofuel. Picture taken June 6, 2013. REUTERS/Jon Nazca (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SPAIN-BIOENERGY/
RTX1119G
June 26, 2013
Aqualia's All-gas project researcher Mara Laureano, 27, collects water samples with Imhoff cones from...
CHICLANA DE LA FRONTERA, Spain
Aqualia's All-gas project researcher Laureano collects water samples with Imhoff cones from a tank at...
Aqualia's All-gas project researcher Mara Laureano, 27, collects water samples with Imhoff cones from a tank at a waste-water treatment plant in Chiclana de la Frontera, near Cadiz, southern Spain June 6, 2013. The Spanish resort town with sprawling golf courses and tree-lined beaches has added another green site to its attractions: the world's first plant to convert sewage into clean energy. The facility in Chiclana de la Frontera on the southwest tip of Spain uses wastewater and sunlight to produce algae-based biofuel as part of a 12 million euro project to pursue alternative energies and reduce reliance on foreign oil. While industries such as breweries or paper mills have produced biogas from wastewater for their own energy needs, All-gas is the first to grow algae from sewage in a systematic way to produce a net export of bioenergy, including vehicle biofuel. Picture taken June 6, 2013. REUTERS/Jon Nazca (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SPAIN-BIOENERGY/
RTX1119N
June 26, 2013
Aqualia's All-gas project researcher Miled Morad, 33, collects a water sample with a container from a...
CHICLANA DE LA FRONTERA, Spain
Aqualia's All-gas project researcher Morad collects a water sample with a container from a tank at a...
Aqualia's All-gas project researcher Miled Morad, 33, collects a water sample with a container from a tank to see it under a microscope at a waste-water treatment plant in Chiclana de la Frontera, near Cadiz, southern Spain June 6, 2013. The Spanish resort town with sprawling golf courses and tree-lined beaches has added another green site to its attractions: the world's first plant to convert sewage into clean energy. The facility in Chiclana de la Frontera on the southwest tip of Spain uses wastewater and sunlight to produce algae-based biofuel as part of a 12 million euro project to pursue alternative energies and reduce reliance on foreign oil. While industries such as breweries or paper mills have produced biogas from wastewater for their own energy needs, All-gas is the first to grow algae from sewage in a systematic way to produce a net export of bioenergy, including vehicle biofuel. Picture taken June 6, 2013. REUTERS/Jon Nazca (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SPAIN-BIOENERGY/
RTX1119O
June 26, 2013
Aqualia's All-gas project researcher Miled Morad, 33, shows a container with a water sample collected...
CHICLANA DE LA FRONTERA, Spain
Aqualia's All-gas project researcher Morad shows a container with a water sample collected from a tank...
Aqualia's All-gas project researcher Miled Morad, 33, shows a container with a water sample collected from a tank to see it under a microscope at a waste-water treatment plant in Chiclana de la Frontera, near Cadiz, southern Spain June 6, 2013. The Spanish resort town with sprawling golf courses and tree-lined beaches has added another green site to its attractions: the world's first plant to convert sewage into clean energy. The facility in Chiclana de la Frontera on the southwest tip of Spain uses wastewater and sunlight to produce algae-based biofuel as part of a 12 million euro project to pursue alternative energies and reduce reliance on foreign oil. While industries such as breweries or paper mills have produced biogas from wastewater for their own energy needs, All-gas is the first to grow algae from sewage in a systematic way to produce a net export of bioenergy, including vehicle biofuel. Picture taken June 6, 2013. REUTERS/Jon Nazca (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SPAIN-BIOENERGY/
RTX1119P
June 26, 2013
Algae colonies are pictured with a digital camera through a microscope after being collected from a tank...
CHICLANA DE LA FRONTERA, Spain
Algae colonies are pictured with a digital camera through a microscope after being collected from a tank...
Algae colonies are pictured with a digital camera through a microscope after being collected from a tank at a waste-water treatment plant in Chiclana de la Frontera, near Cadiz, southern Spain June 6, 2013. The Spanish resort town with sprawling golf courses and tree-lined beaches has added another green site to its attractions: the world's first plant to convert sewage into clean energy. The facility in Chiclana de la Frontera on the southwest tip of Spain uses wastewater and sunlight to produce algae-based biofuel as part of a 12 million euro project to pursue alternative energies and reduce reliance on foreign oil. While industries such as breweries or paper mills have produced biogas from wastewater for their own energy needs, All-gas is the first to grow algae from sewage in a systematic way to produce a net export of bioenergy, including vehicle biofuel. Picture taken June 6, 2013. REUTERS/Jon Nazca (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
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