Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Society

RTX12I7K
The Parents of Poland's Emigrants - 12 Aug 2013
Reuters photographer Peter Andrews spent time photographing the parents of young emigrants in Poland. Since Poland joined the European Union in 2004, many of its citizens have taken the opportunity to move to Western Europe to live and work. A large number travelled to Britain, and Polish is now the second most-spoken language in the country. Generations of migration for varied reasons, from economic emigration to social displacement, mean that there are Polish communities scattered in countries around the world. According to the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, between 15 and 20 million people of Polish ancestry are living outside Poland, which has a population of around 38.5 million.
POLAND/
RTX12I7O
August 12, 2013
Polish actors and restaurant owners Barbara Zielinska, 54, and her husband Edward Dargiewicz, 60, pose...
Warsaw, Poland
Polish actors and restaurant owners Barbara Zielinska and her husband Edward pose with a large photograph...
Polish actors and restaurant owners Barbara Zielinska, 54, and her husband Edward Dargiewicz, 60, pose with a large photograph of their daughter Martyna, 26, who emigrated Britain, as they stand inside their restaurant in Warsaw June 26, 2013. After finishing high school in the United States, Martyna, studied at the London School of Fashion and now lives in London. Since Poland joined the European Union in 2004, many of its citizens have taken the opportunity to move to Western Europe to live and work. A large number travelled to Britain, and Polish is now the second most-spoken language in the country. Generations of migration for varied reasons, from economic emigration to social displacement, mean that there are Polish communities scattered in countries around the world. According to the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, between 15 and 20 million people of Polish ancestry are living outside Poland, which has a population of around 38.5 million. Picture taken June 26, 2013. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS IMMIGRATION BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 05 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'THE PARENTS OF POLAND'S EMIGRANTS'. SEARCH 'POLAND EMIGRANT' FOR ALL IMAGES
POLAND/
RTX12I7T
August 12, 2013
Polish bank worker Hanna Mieszkowska, 53, poses with a wedding photograph of her son Piotr and his wife...
Warsaw, Poland
Polish bank worker Hanna Mieszkowska poses with a wedding photograph of her son, at her apartment in...
Polish bank worker Hanna Mieszkowska, 53, poses with a wedding photograph of her son Piotr and his wife Ghizlane, who is of Moroccan origin, at her apartment in Warsaw June 19, 2013. Piotr, 32, met his sweetheart during an Erasmus programme in Spain, got married in Morocco and now live in Paris. Since Poland joined the European Union in 2004, many of its citizens have taken the opportunity to move to Western Europe to live and work. A large number travelled to Britain, and Polish is now the second most-spoken language in the country. Generations of migration for varied reasons, from economic emigration to social displacement, mean that there are Polish communities scattered in countries around the world. According to the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, between 15 and 20 million people of Polish ancestry are living outside Poland, which has a population of around 38.5 million. Picture taken June 19, 2013. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS IMMIGRATION BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 10 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'THE PARENTS OF POLAND'S EMIGRANTS'. SEARCH 'POLAND EMIGRANT' FOR ALL IMAGES
POLAND/
RTX12I7Q
August 12, 2013
Polish farmer Tadeusz Weremczuk, 57, and his wife Maria, 54, pose with photographs of their four children,...
DOLHOBRODY, Poland
Polish farmer Tadeusz Weremczuk and his wife Maria pose with photographs of their four children, all...
Polish farmer Tadeusz Weremczuk, 57, and his wife Maria, 54, pose with photographs of their four children, all of whom have emigrated to Britain, as they stand in the kitchen of their house in Dolhobrody, eastern Poland June 25, 2013. Their children, Dawid, 34, Kinga, 33, Remi, 26 and Natalia, 25 have lived in Britain for between one and eight years. Since Poland joined the European Union in 2004, many of its citizens have taken the opportunity to move to Western Europe to live and work. A large number travelled to Britain, and Polish is now the second most-spoken language in the country. Generations of migration for varied reasons, from economic emigration to social displacement, mean that there are Polish communities scattered in countries around the world. According to the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, between 15 and 20 million people of Polish ancestry are living outside Poland, which has a population of around 38.5 million. Picture taken June 25, 2013. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS IMMIGRATION BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 07 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'THE PARENTS OF POLAND'S EMIGRANTS'. SEARCH 'POLAND EMIGRANT' FOR ALL IMAGES
POLAND/
RTX12I7H
August 12, 2013
Polish plastic surgeon Monika Grzesiak, 48, poses with a photograph of her son Lukasz at her apartment...
Warsaw, Poland
Polish plastic surgeon Grzesiak poses with a photograph of her son Lukasz at her apartment in Warsaw
Polish plastic surgeon Monika Grzesiak, 48, poses with a photograph of her son Lukasz at her apartment in Warsaw June 30, 2013. Lukasz, 22, graduated from New York University and has found his first job in New York. Since Poland joined the European Union in 2004, many of its citizens have taken the opportunity to move to Western Europe to live and work. A large number travelled to Britain, and Polish is now the second most-spoken language in the country. Generations of migration for varied reasons, from economic emigration to social displacement, mean that there are Polish communities scattered in countries around the world. According to the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, between 15 and 20 million people of Polish ancestry are living outside Poland, which has a population of around 38.5 million. Photo taken June 30, 2013. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS IMMIGRATION BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 01 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'THE PARENTS OF POLAND'S EMIGRANTS'. SEARCH 'POLAND EMIGRANT' FOR ALL IMAGES
POLAND/
RTX12I7J
August 12, 2013
Polish teacher Malgorzata Dyszlewska, 62, poses with a photograph of her daughter Anna Davis with her...
Warsaw, Poland
Polish teacher Malgorzata Dyszlewska poses with a photograph of her daughter Anna Davis with her family,...
Polish teacher Malgorzata Dyszlewska, 62, poses with a photograph of her daughter Anna Davis with her family, at her apartment in Warsaw June 26, 2013. Davis, 29, emigrated to Britain 11 years ago and now lives and works in Kidwelly, Wales. Since Poland joined the European Union in 2004, many of its citizens have taken the opportunity to move to Western Europe to live and work. A large number travelled to Britain, and Polish is now the second most-spoken language in the country. Generations of migration for varied reasons, from economic emigration to social displacement, mean that there are Polish communities scattered in countries around the world. According to the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, between 15 and 20 million people of Polish ancestry are living outside Poland, which has a population of around 38.5 million. Picture taken June 26, 2013. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS IMMIGRATION BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 02 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'THE PARENTS OF POLAND'S EMIGRANTS'. SEARCH 'POLAND EMIGRANT' FOR ALL IMAGES
POLAND/
RTX12I7L
August 12, 2013
Polish pharmacist Anna Naborowska, 52, and her husband sound engineer Jaroslaw Naborowski, 56, pose with...
Warsaw, Poland
Polish pharmacist Anna Naborowska and her husband sound engineer Jaroslaw pose with a photograph of their...
Polish pharmacist Anna Naborowska, 52, and her husband sound engineer Jaroslaw Naborowski, 56, pose with a photograph of their daughter Joanna at their home in Warsaw June 23, 2013. Joanna, 27, emigrated to the Iberian Peninsula and presently lives and works in Barcelona, Spain. Since Poland joined the European Union in 2004, many of its citizens have taken the opportunity to move to Western Europe to live and work. A large number travelled to Britain, and Polish is now the second most-spoken language in the country. Generations of migration for varied reasons, from economic emigration to social displacement, mean that there are Polish communities scattered in countries around the world. According to the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, between 15 and 20 million people of Polish ancestry are living outside Poland, which has a population of around 38.5 million. Picture taken June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS IMMIGRATION BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 03 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'THE PARENTS OF POLAND'S EMIGRANTS'. SEARCH 'POLAND EMIGRANT' FOR ALL IMAGES
POLAND/
RTX12I7M
August 12, 2013
Polish housewife Dorota Szmaus, 53, poses with photographs of her two children Bartosz, 30, and Weronika,...
OTREBUSY, Poland
Polish housewife Dorota Szmaus poses with photographs of her two children at her home in Otrebusy
Polish housewife Dorota Szmaus, 53, poses with photographs of her two children Bartosz, 30, and Weronika, 25, at her home in Otrebusy, June 24, 2013. Bartosz and Weronika both emigrated to Britain, and live in Brentwood, Essex. Since Poland joined the European Union in 2004, many of its citizens have taken the opportunity to move to Western Europe to live and work. A large number travelled to Britain, and Polish is now the second most-spoken language in the country. Generations of migration for varied reasons, from economic emigration to social displacement, mean that there are Polish communities scattered in countries around the world. According to the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, between 15 and 20 million people of Polish ancestry are living outside Poland, which has a population of around 38.5 million. Picture taken June 24, 2013. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS IMMIGRATION BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 04 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'THE PARENTS OF POLAND'S EMIGRANTS'. SEARCH 'POLAND EMIGRANT' FOR ALL IMAGES
POLAND/
RTX12I7P
August 12, 2013
Polish civil servant Boguslawa Dobrzynska, 63, poses with a wedding photograph of her son Michal, at...
Minsk Mazowiecki, Poland
Polish civil servant Boguslawa Dobrzynska poses with a wedding photograph of her son Michal, at her home...
Polish civil servant Boguslawa Dobrzynska, 63, poses with a wedding photograph of her son Michal, at her home in Minsk Mazowiecki, Poland June 23, 2013. After leaving Poland, Michal and his wife Jagoda have studied and worked in Spain, Romania and currently reside in Switzerland. Since Poland joined the European Union in 2004, many of its citizens have taken the opportunity to move to Western Europe to live and work. A large number travelled to Britain, and Polish is now the second most-spoken language in the country. Generations of migration for varied reasons, from economic emigration to social displacement, mean that there are Polish communities scattered in countries around the world. According to the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, between 15 and 20 million people of Polish ancestry are living outside Poland, which has a population of around 38.5 million. Picture taken June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS IMMIGRATION BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 06 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'THE PARENTS OF POLAND'S EMIGRANTS'. SEARCH 'POLAND EMIGRANT' FOR ALL IMAGES
POLAND/
RTX12I7R
August 12, 2013
Polish hospital administrator Katarzyna Wojcicka, 55, poses with a photograph of her son Maciej, his...
Warsaw, Poland
Polish hospital administrator Katarzyna Wojcicka poses with a photograph of her son Maciej at her apartment...
Polish hospital administrator Katarzyna Wojcicka, 55, poses with a photograph of her son Maciej, his wife Alina and their son Mateusz in her son's former bedroom at her apartment in Warsaw June 27, 2013. Maciej, 30, emigrated to Ireland nine years ago when Poland joined the EU, he is now married to Polish woman Alina and lives in Waterford, Ireland. Since Poland joined the European Union in 2004, many of its citizens have taken the opportunity to move to Western Europe to live and work. A large number travelled to Britain, and Polish is now the second most-spoken language in the country. Generations of migration for varied reasons, from economic emigration to social displacement, mean that there are Polish communities scattered in countries around the world. According to the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, between 15 and 20 million people of Polish ancestry are living outside Poland, which has a population of around 38.5 million. Picture taken June 27, 2013. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS IMMIGRATION BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 08 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'THE PARENTS OF POLAND'S EMIGRANTS'. SEARCH 'POLAND EMIGRANT' FOR ALL IMAGES
POLAND/
RTX12I7S
August 12, 2013
Polish cleaner Katarzyna Wawrzyniak 52, poses with a photograph of her son Daniel Wawrzyniak, in her...
MIEDZYLESIE, Poland
Polish cleaner Katarzyna Wawrzyniak poses with a photograph of her son, in her apartment in Miedzylesie...
Polish cleaner Katarzyna Wawrzyniak 52, poses with a photograph of her son Daniel Wawrzyniak, in her apartment in Miedzylesie, June 17, 2013. Daniel, 31, emigrated in 2005, and now lives with his family in Athlone, Ireland. Since Poland joined the European Union in 2004, many of its citizens have taken the opportunity to move to Western Europe to live and work. A large number travelled to Britain, and Polish is now the second most-spoken language in the country. Generations of migration for varied reasons, from economic emigration to social displacement, mean that there are Polish communities scattered in countries around the world. According to the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, between 15 and 20 million people of Polish ancestry are living outside Poland, which has a population of around 38.5 million. Picture taken June 17, 2013. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS IMMIGRATION BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 09 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'THE PARENTS OF POLAND'S EMIGRANTS'. SEARCH 'POLAND EMIGRANT' FOR ALL IMAGES
POLAND/
RTX12I7X
August 12, 2013
Polish television stylist Dorota Williams, 45, poses with a photograph of her daughter Klaudia Redzisz...
Warsaw, Poland
Polish television stylist Dorota Williams poses with a photograph of her daughter Klaudia Redzisz at...
Polish television stylist Dorota Williams, 45, poses with a photograph of her daughter Klaudia Redzisz at her office in Warsaw July 1, 2013. Klaudia, 28, moved to Italy five years ago, where she studied at the University of Florence. She now lives in Sydney, Australia, where she works for a movie production company. Since Poland joined the European Union in 2004, many of its citizens have taken the opportunity to move to Western Europe to live and work. A large number travelled to Britain, and Polish is now the second most-spoken language in the country. Generations of migration for varied reasons, from economic emigration to social displacement, mean that there are Polish communities scattered in countries around the world. According to the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, between 15 and 20 million people of Polish ancestry are living outside Poland, which has a population of around 38.5 million. Picture taken July 1, 2013. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS IMMIGRATION BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 11 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'THE PARENTS OF POLAND'S EMIGRANTS'. SEARCH 'POLAND EMIGRANT' FOR ALL IMAGES
POLAND/
RTX12I7Z
August 12, 2013
A combination photo shows Polish parents holding photos of their children who have emigrated to other...
Warsaw, Poland
A combination photo shows Polish parents holding photos of their children who have emigrated to other...
A combination photo shows Polish parents holding photos of their children who have emigrated to other countries. Pictured are (clockwise from top L): bank worker Hanna Mieszkowska, hospital administrator Katarzyna Wojcicka, pharmacist Anna Naborowska and her husband sound engineer Jaroslaw Naborowski, civil servant Boguslawa Dobrzynska, plastic surgeon Monika Grzesiak, cleaner Katarzyna Wawrzyniak, farmer Tadeusz Weremczuk and his wife Maria, television stylist Dorota Williams and actors/restaurant owners Barbara Zielinska and her husband Edward Dargiewicz (C). Since Poland joined the European Union in 2004, many of its citizens have taken the opportunity to move to Western Europe to live and work. A large number travelled to Britain, and Polish is now the second most-spoken language in the country. Generations of migration for varied reasons, from economic emigration to social displacement, mean that there are Polish communities scattered in countries around the world. According to the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, between 15 and 20 million people of Polish ancestry are living outside Poland, which has a population of around 38.5 million. Pictures taken between June 17 and July 1, 2013. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS IMMIGRATION BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 12 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'THE PARENTS OF POLAND'S EMIGRANTS'. SEARCH 'POLAND EMIGRANT' FOR ALL IMAGES
Display
Items per page
Page
of 1