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Society

RTX13NFD
Diving for debris - 10 Jul 2013
Every morning and evening during high tide, up to 40 boats of different shapes and sizes with crews of between four and eight people leave the former capital for the dangerous job of salvaging items from Yangon River's muddy waters. Wearing flimsy-looking gas masks attached to rubber water pipe, the divers jump into the water in search of coal and iron from sunken ships to be sold later. Some divers have lost their lives on the job when their ropes break or when they get caught in fishing nets and hooks. Divers say each boat earns about $1000 a month in this tiring and lethal job
MYANMAR/
RTX11JGX
July 11, 2013
A diver holds his mask on a small boat on Yangon River after searching for coal and iron from sunken...
Yangon, Myanmar
A diver holds his mask on a small boat on Yangon River after searching for coal and iron from sunken...
A diver holds his mask on a small boat on Yangon River after searching for coal and iron from sunken ships July 10, 2013. Every morning and evening during high tide, up to 40 boats of different shapes and sizes with crews of between four and eight people leave the former capital for the dangerous job of salvaging items from Yangon River's muddy waters. Wearing flimsy-looking gas masks attached to rubber water pipe, the divers jump into the water in search of coal and iron from sunken ships to be sold later. Some divers have lost their lives on the job when their ropes break or when they get caught in fishing nets and hooks. Divers say each boat earns about $1000 a month in this tiring and lethal job. Picture taken July 10, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY TRANSPORT)
MYANMAR/
RTX11JG7
July 11, 2013
A diver adjusts his mask on a small boat on Yangon river as he prepares to search for coal and iron from...
Yangon, Myanmar
A diver adjusts his mask on a small boat on Yangon river as he prepares to search for coal and iron from...
A diver adjusts his mask on a small boat on Yangon river as he prepares to search for coal and iron from sunken ships, July 10, 2013. Every morning and evening during high tide, up to 40 boats of different shapes and sizes with crews of between four and eight people leave the former capital for the dangerous job of salvaging items from Yangon River's muddy waters. Wearing flimsy-looking gas masks attached to rubber water pipe, the divers jump into the water in search of coal and iron from sunken ships to be sold later. Some divers have lost their lives on the job when their ropes break or when they get caught in fishing nets and hooks. Divers say each boat earns about $1000 a month in this tiring and lethal job. Picture taken July 10, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
MYANMAR/
RTX11JG3
July 11, 2013
A diver holds his mask as he attempts to get up on a small boat on Yangon river, after retrieving some...
Yangon, Myanmar
A diver holds his mask as he attempts to get up on a small boat on Yangon river, after retrieving some...
A diver holds his mask as he attempts to get up on a small boat on Yangon river, after retrieving some coal and iron from sunken ships, July 10, 2013. Every morning and evening during high tide, up to 40 boats of different shapes and sizes with crews of between four and eight people leave the former capital for the dangerous job of salvaging items from Yangon River's muddy waters. Wearing flimsy-looking gas masks attached to rubber water pipe, the divers jump into the water in search of coal and iron from sunken ships to be sold later. Some divers have lost their lives on the job when their ropes break or when they get caught in fishing nets and hooks. Divers say each boat earns about $1000 a month in this tiring and lethal job. Picture taken July 10, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
MYANMAR/
RTX11JH4
July 11, 2013
A man with tattoos is pictured on a small boat on Yangon River as its crew searches for coal and iron...
Yangon, Myanmar
A man with a tattoos is pictured on a small boat on Yangon River as its crew searches for coal and iron...
A man with tattoos is pictured on a small boat on Yangon River as its crew searches for coal and iron from sunken ships, July 10, 2013. Every morning and evening during high tide, up to 40 boats of different shapes and sizes with crews of between four and eight people leave the former capital for the dangerous job of salvaging items from Yangon River's muddy waters. Wearing flimsy-looking gas masks attached to rubber water pipe, the divers jump into the water in search of coal and iron from sunken ships to be sold later. Some divers have lost their lives on the job when their ropes break or when they get caught in fishing nets and hooks. Divers say each boat earns about $1000 a month in this tiring and lethal job. Picture taken July 10, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
MYANMAR/
RTX11JH0
July 11, 2013
A primitive mask is attached to a rubber pipe used by divers to go as deep as 200 feet (61 metres) underwater...
Yangon, Myanmar
A primitive mask is attached to a rubber pipe used by divers to go as deep as 200 feet underwater in...
A primitive mask is attached to a rubber pipe used by divers to go as deep as 200 feet (61 metres) underwater in search of coal and iron from sunken ships on Yangon River July 10, 2013. Every morning and evening during high tide, up to 40 boats of different shapes and sizes with crews of between four and eight people leave the former capital for the dangerous job of salvaging items from Yangon River's muddy waters. Wearing flimsy-looking gas masks attached to rubber water pipe, the divers jump into the water in search of coal and iron from sunken ships to be sold later. Some divers have lost their lives on the job when their ropes break or when they get caught in fishing nets and hooks. Divers say each boat earns about $1000 a month in this tiring and lethal job. Picture taken July 10, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY TRANSPORT BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
MYANMAR/
RTX11JGZ
July 11, 2013
People travel on their small boat on Yangon River in search of coal and iron from sunken ships July 10,...
Yangon, Myanmar
People travel on their small boat on Yangon River in search of coal and iron from sunken ships
People travel on their small boat on Yangon River in search of coal and iron from sunken ships July 10, 2013. Every morning and evening during high tide, up to 40 boats of different shapes and sizes with crews of between four and eight people leave the former capital for the dangerous job of salvaging items from Yangon River's muddy waters. Wearing flimsy-looking gas masks attached to rubber water pipe, the divers jump into the water in search of coal and iron from sunken ships to be sold later. Some divers have lost their lives on the job when their ropes break or when they get caught in fishing nets and hooks. Divers say each boat earns about $1000 a month in this tiring and lethal job. Picture taken July 10, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
MYANMAR/
RTX11JGT
July 11, 2013
A diver places a piece of coal retrieved from a sunken ship onto a small boat on Yangon River, July 10,...
Yangon, Myanmar
A diver places a piece of coal retrieved from a sunken ship onto a small boat on Yangon River
A diver places a piece of coal retrieved from a sunken ship onto a small boat on Yangon River, July 10, 2013. Every morning and evening during high tide, up to 40 boats of different shapes and sizes with crews of between four and eight people leave the former capital for the dangerous job of salvaging items from Yangon River's muddy waters. Wearing flimsy-looking gas masks attached to rubber water pipe, the divers jump into the water in search of coal and iron from sunken ships to be sold later. Some divers have lost their lives on the job when their ropes break or when they get caught in fishing nets and hooks. Divers say each boat earns about $1000 a month in this tiring and lethal job. month. Picture taken July 10, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
MYANMAR/
RTX11JGI
July 11, 2013
People travel on their small boat on Yangon River in search of coal and iron from sunken ships July 10,...
Yangon, Myanmar
People travel on their small boat on Yangon River in search of coal and iron from sunken ships
People travel on their small boat on Yangon River in search of coal and iron from sunken ships July 10, 2013. Every morning and evening during high tide, up to 40 boats of different shapes and sizes with crews of between four and eight people leave the former capital for the dangerous job of salvaging items from Yangon River's muddy waters. Wearing flimsy-looking gas masks attached to rubber water pipe, the divers jump into the water in search of coal and iron from sunken ships to be sold later. Some divers have lost their lives on the job when their ropes break or when they get caught in fishing nets and hooks. Divers say each boat earns about $1000 a month in this tiring and lethal job. Picture taken July 10, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
MYANMAR/
RTX11JGD
July 11, 2013
A diver holds his mask on a small boat on Yangon River after searching for coal and iron from sunken...
Yangon, Myanmar
A diver holds his mask on a small boat on Yangon River after searching for coal and iron from sunken...
A diver holds his mask on a small boat on Yangon River after searching for coal and iron from sunken ships July 10, 2013. Every morning and evening during high tide, up to 40 boats of different shapes and sizes with crews of between four and eight people leave the former capital for the dangerous job of salvaging items from Yangon River's muddy waters. Wearing flimsy-looking gas masks attached to rubber water pipe, the divers jump into the water in search of coal and iron from sunken ships to be sold later. Some divers have lost their lives on the job when their ropes break or when they get caught in fishing nets and hooks. Divers say each boat earns about $1000 a month in this tiring and lethal job. Picture taken July 10, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
MYANMAR/
RTX11JGC
July 11, 2013
Coal and iron from a sunken ship are retrieved by a diver onto a small boat on Yangon River July 10,...
Yangon, Myanmar
Coal and iron from a sunken ship are retrieved by a diver onto a small boat on Yangon River
Coal and iron from a sunken ship are retrieved by a diver onto a small boat on Yangon River July 10, 2013. Every morning and evening during high tide, up to 40 boats of different shapes and sizes with crews of between four and eight people leave the former capital for the dangerous job of salvaging items from Yangon River's muddy waters. Wearing flimsy-looking gas masks attached to rubber water pipe, the divers jump into the water in search of coal and iron from sunken ships to be sold later. Some divers have lost their lives on the job when their ropes break or when they get caught in fishing nets and hooks. Divers say each boat earns about $1000 a month in this tiring and lethal job. Picture taken July 10, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
MYANMAR/
RTX11JG5
July 11, 2013
A man operates the engine of a small boat on Yangon river as its crew searches for coal and iron from...
Yangon, Myanmar
A man operates the engine of a small boat on Yangon river as its crew searches for coal and iron from...
A man operates the engine of a small boat on Yangon river as its crew searches for coal and iron from sunken ships July 10, 2013. Every morning and evening during high tide, up to 40 boats of different shapes and sizes with crews of between four and eight people leave the former capital for the dangerous job of salvaging items from Yangon River's muddy waters. Wearing flimsy-looking gas masks attached to rubber water pipe, the divers jump into the water in search of coal and iron from sunken ships to be sold later. Some divers have lost their lives on the job when their ropes break or when they get caught in fishing nets and hooks. Divers say each boat earns about $1000 a month in this tiring and lethal job. Picture taken July 10, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
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