Ajax loader

Orientation 

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Society 

RTX155KK 
Gurkhas - a Lost Generation - 08 Nov 2013 
The somewhat run-down area has in recent years become home to many veterans from the famous Brigade of Gurkhas, a force recruited in Nepal which has fought for Britain for almost 200 years. But though they have been a part of the country's army, many elderly ex-Gurkhas, along with their families, struggle to adapt to British life. 
BRITAIN-GURKHAS/
RTX155AR 
November 08, 2013 
Nepalese women walk past a 99 pence discount shop on the edge of the town centre in Aldershot in southern... 
Aldershot, United Kingdom 
Nepalese women walk past a 99 pence discount shop on the edge of the town centre in Aldershot 
Nepalese women walk past a 99 pence discount shop on the edge of the town centre in Aldershot in southern England October 29, 2013. An estimated 10,000 ex-Gurkha heads of family live in Britain, having come here after serving in the famous brigade that since 1815 has fought in numerous conflicts, from Gallipoli to Malaya to the current war in Afghanistan. But though they have been part of the British army, many older ex-Gurkhas do not speak good English and find navigating life in the country a challenge. The veterans' situation has helped fuel protests by a group of ex-Gurkhas, their families and supporters, who are calling for improvements to their pensions and other benefits. After a series of 24-hour fasts by demonstrators, protest organiser Gyanraj Rai on November 7, 2013 began an all-out hunger strike to push for their demands, which start with equal pension payments for Gurkha soldiers compared to their counterparts in other parts of the British army. Picture taken October 29, 2013. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY IMMIGRATION) 
BRITAIN-GURKHAS/
RTX155B7 
November 08, 2013 
Family of retired Gurkha soldiers stand in protest during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster... 
London, United Kingdom 
Family of retired Gurkha soldiers stand in protest during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster... 
Family of retired Gurkha soldiers stand in protest during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster in London October 25, 2013. An estimated 10,000 ex-Gurkha heads of family live in Britain, having come here after serving in the famous brigade that since 1815 has fought in numerous conflicts, from Gallipoli to Malaya to the current war in Afghanistan. But though they have been part of the British army, many older ex-Gurkhas do not speak good English and find navigating life in the country a challenge. The veterans' situation has helped fuel protests by a group of ex-Gurkhas, their families and supporters, who are calling for improvements to their pensions and other benefits. After a series of 24-hour fasts by demonstrators, protest organiser Gyanraj Rai on November 7, 2013 began an all-out hunger strike to push for their demands, which start with equal pension payments for Gurkha soldiers compared to their counterparts in other parts of the British army. To match Story BRITAIN-GURKHAS/ Picture taken October 25, 2013. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY IMMIGRATION CIVIL UNREST) 
BRITAIN-GURKHAS/
RTX155AY 
November 08, 2013 
Retired Gurkha soldiers march in protest during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster in... 
London, United Kingdom 
Retired Gurkha soldiers march in protest during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster in... 
Retired Gurkha soldiers march in protest during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster in London October 25, 2013. An estimated 10,000 ex-Gurkha heads of family live in Britain, having come here after serving in the famous brigade that since 1815 has fought in numerous conflicts, from Gallipoli to Malaya to the current war in Afghanistan. But though they have been part of the British army, many older ex-Gurkhas do not speak good English and find navigating life in the country a challenge. The veterans' situation has helped fuel protests by a group of ex-Gurkhas, their families and supporters, who are calling for improvements to their pensions and other benefits. After a series of 24-hour fasts by demonstrators, protest organiser Gyanraj Rai on November 7, 2013 began an all-out hunger strike to push for their demands, which start with equal pension payments for Gurkha soldiers compared to their counterparts in other parts of the British army. Picture taken October 25, 2013. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY IMMIGRATION) 
BRITAIN-GURKHAS/
RTX155B2 
November 08, 2013 
Retired Gurkha soldiers stand in protest during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster in... 
London, United Kingdom 
Retired Gurkha soldiers stand in protest during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster in... 
Retired Gurkha soldiers stand in protest during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster in London October 25, 2013. An estimated 10,000 ex-Gurkha heads of family live in Britain, having come here after serving in the famous brigade that since 1815 has fought in numerous conflicts, from Gallipoli to Malaya to the current war in Afghanistan. But though they have been part of the British army, many older ex-Gurkhas do not speak good English and find navigating life in the country a challenge. The veterans' situation has helped fuel protests by a group of ex-Gurkhas, their families and supporters, who are calling for improvements to their pensions and other benefits. After a series of 24-hour fasts by demonstrators, protest organiser Gyanraj Rai on November 7, 2013 began an all-out hunger strike to push for their demands, which start with equal pension payments for Gurkha soldiers compared to their counterparts in other parts of the British army. To match Story BRITAIN-GURKHAS/ Picture taken October 25, 2013. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY IMMIGRATION CIVIL UNREST) 
BRITAIN-GURKHAS/
RTX155AZ 
November 08, 2013 
Captain Dharma, a retired Gurkha soldier, demonstrates outside the Palace of Westminster in London October... 
London, United Kingdom 
Captain Dharma, a retired Gurkha soldier, demonstrates outside the Palace of Westminster in London 
Captain Dharma, a retired Gurkha soldier, demonstrates outside the Palace of Westminster in London October 25, 2013. An estimated 10,000 ex-Gurkha heads of family live in Britain, having come here after serving in the famous brigade that since 1815 has fought in numerous conflicts, from Gallipoli to Malaya to the current war in Afghanistan. But though they have been part of the British army, many older ex-Gurkhas do not speak good English and find navigating life in the country a challenge. The veterans' situation has helped fuel protests by a group of ex-Gurkhas, their families and supporters, who are calling for improvements to their pensions and other benefits. After a series of 24-hour fasts by demonstrators, protest organiser Gyanraj Rai on November 7, 2013 began an all-out hunger strike to push for their demands, which start with equal pension payments for Gurkha soldiers compared to their counterparts in other parts of the British army. Picture taken October 25, 2013. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY IMMIGRATION CIVIL UNREST) 
BRITAIN-GURKHAS/
RTX155AV 
November 08, 2013 
Retired Gurkha soldiers march in protest during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster in... 
London, United Kingdom 
Retired Gurkha soldiers march in protest during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster in... 
Retired Gurkha soldiers march in protest during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster in London October 25, 2013. An estimated 10,000 ex-Gurkha heads of family live in Britain, having come here after serving in the famous brigade that since 1815 has fought in numerous conflicts, from Gallipoli to Malaya to the current war in Afghanistan. But though they have been part of the British army, many older ex-Gurkhas do not speak good English and find navigating life in the country a challenge. The veterans' situation has helped fuel protests by a group of ex-Gurkhas, their families and supporters, who are calling for improvements to their pensions and other benefits. After a series of 24-hour fasts by demonstrators, protest organiser Gyanraj Rai on November 7, 2013 began an all-out hunger strike to push for their demands, which start with equal pension payments for Gurkha soldiers compared to their counterparts in other parts of the British army. Picture taken October 25, 2013. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY IMMIGRATION CIVIL UNREST) 
BRITAIN-GURKHAS/
RTX155B6 
November 08, 2013 
A retired Gurkha soldier sits down during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster in London... 
London, United Kingdom 
A retired Gurkha soldier sits down during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster in London... 
A retired Gurkha soldier sits down during a demonstration outside the Palace of Westminster in London October 25, 2013. An estimated 10,000 ex-Gurkha heads of family live in Britain, having come here after serving in the famous brigade that since 1815 has fought in numerous conflicts, from Gallipoli to Malaya to the current war in Afghanistan. But though they have been part of the British army, many older ex-Gurkhas do not speak good English and find navigating life in the country a challenge. The veterans' situation has helped fuel protests by a group of ex-Gurkhas, their families and supporters, who are calling for improvements to their pensions and other benefits. After a series of 24-hour fasts by demonstrators, protest organiser Gyanraj Rai on November 7, 2013 began an all-out hunger strike to push for their demands, which start with equal pension payments for Gurkha soldiers compared to their counterparts in other parts of the British army. To match Story BRITAIN-GURKHAS/Picture taken October 25, 2013. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY IMMIGRATION CIVIL UNREST) 
BRITAIN-GURKHAS/
RTX155CG 
November 08, 2013 
Retired Captain Birbahadur Thapa, a retired Gurkha solider, gestures in a sitting room in Aldershot in... 
Aldershot, United Kingdom 
Thapa, a retired Gurkha solider, gestures in a sitting room in Aldershot 
Retired Captain Birbahadur Thapa, a retired Gurkha solider, gestures in a sitting room in Aldershot in southern England October 29, 2013. An estimated 10,000 ex-Gurkha heads of family live in Britain, having come here after serving in the famous brigade that since 1815 has fought in numerous conflicts, from Gallipoli to Malaya to the current war in Afghanistan. But though they have been part of the British army, many older ex-Gurkhas do not speak good English and find navigating life in the country a challenge. The veterans' situation has helped fuel protests by a group of ex-Gurkhas, their families and supporters, who are calling for improvements to their pensions and other benefits. After a series of 24-hour fasts by demonstrators, protest organiser Gyanraj Rai on November 7, 2013 began an all-out hunger strike to push for their demands, which start with equal pension payments for Gurkha soldiers compared to their counterparts in other parts of the British army. To match Story BRITAIN-GURKHAS/ Picture taken October 29, 2013. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY IMMIGRATION) 
BRITAIN-GURKHAS/
RTX155BA 
November 08, 2013 
Hari Thupa, 71, a retired Gurkha Captain, poses with a photograph of himself as a young soldier as he... 
Aldershot, United Kingdom 
Thupa, a retired Gurkha Captain, poses with a photograph of himself as a young soldier as he sits in... 
Hari Thupa, 71, a retired Gurkha Captain, poses with a photograph of himself as a young soldier as he sits in his sitting room in Aldershot in southern England October 29, 2013. An estimated 10,000 ex-Gurkha heads of family live in Britain, having come here after serving in the famous brigade that since 1815 has fought in numerous conflicts, from Gallipoli to Malaya to the current war in Afghanistan. But though they have been part of the British army, many older ex-Gurkhas do not speak good English and find navigating life in the country a challenge. The veterans' situation has helped fuel protests by a group of ex-Gurkhas, their families and supporters, who are calling for improvements to their pensions and other benefits. After a series of 24-hour fasts by demonstrators, protest organiser Gyanraj Rai on November 7, 2013 began an all-out hunger strike to push for their demands, which start with equal pension payments for Gurkha soldiers compared to their counterparts in other parts of the British army. To match Story BRITAIN-GURKHAS/ Picture taken October 29, 2013. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY IMMIGRATION) 
BRITAIN-GURKHAS/
RTX155AS 
November 08, 2013 
Tikendra Dal Dewan, a retired Gurkha major and chairman of the British Gurkha Welfare Association, sits... 
Aldershot, United Kingdom 
Dewan, a retired Gurkha major and chairman of the British Gurkha Welfare Association, sits behind his... 
Tikendra Dal Dewan, a retired Gurkha major and chairman of the British Gurkha Welfare Association, sits behind his desk in Aldershot, southern England October 29, 2013. An estimated 10,000 ex-Gurkha heads of family live in Britain, having come here after serving in the famous brigade that since 1815 has fought in numerous conflicts, from Gallipoli to Malaya to the current war in Afghanistan. But though they have been part of the British army, many older ex-Gurkhas do not speak good English and find navigating life in the country a challenge. The veterans' situation has helped fuel protests by a group of ex-Gurkhas, their families and supporters, who are calling for improvements to their pensions and other benefits. After a series of 24-hour fasts by demonstrators, protest organiser Gyanraj Rai on November 7, 2013 began an all-out hunger strike to push for their demands, which start with equal pension payments for Gurkha soldiers compared to their counterparts in other parts of the British army. Picture taken October 29, 2013. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY IMMIGRATION) 
BRITAIN-GURKHAS/
RTX155BI 
November 08, 2013 
Bhim Prashad Gurung, who served in the Gurkha regiment of the British army, tells a joke as his wife... 
GURUNG, Nepal 
Gurung, who served in the Gurkha regiment of the British army, tells a joke as his wife enters the room... 
Bhim Prashad Gurung, who served in the Gurkha regiment of the British army, tells a joke as his wife Kamalawoti Gurung enters the room at home in Gurung Village in Pokhara valley, west of Kathmandu October 29, 2013. An estimated 10,000 ex-Gurkha heads of family live in Britain, having come here after serving in the famous brigade that since 1815 has fought in numerous conflicts, from Gallipoli to Malaya to the current war in Afghanistan. But though they have been part of the British army, many older ex-Gurkhas do not speak good English and find navigating life in the country a challenge. After a series of 24-hour fasts by demonstrators, protest organiser Gyanraj Rai on November 7, 2013 began an all-out hunger strike to push for their demands, which start with equal pension payments for Gurkha soldiers compared to their counterparts in other parts of the British army. Gurkha protesters say that current pensions do not stretch far enough in Nepal, but William Shuttlewood, director of the GurkhaWelfare Trust charity contends that they can provide a "very good standard of living" there. Gurung disagrees. He receives a pension of around £350 a month, which he says would not be enough without extra income that he makes from a rice field. To match Story BRITAIN-GURKHAS/ Picture taken October 29, 2013. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY IMMIGRATION) 
BRITAIN-GURKHAS/
RTX155BJ 
November 08, 2013 
Bhim Prashad Gurung, who served in the Gurkha regiment of the British army, and his wife Kamalawoti Gurung... 
GURUNG, Nepal 
Gurung, who served in the Gurkha regiment of the British army, and his wife row a boat on Phewa Lake... 
Bhim Prashad Gurung, who served in the Gurkha regiment of the British army, and his wife Kamalawoti Gurung row a boat on Phewa Lake in front of their house in Pokhara valley, west of Kathmandu October 29, 2013. An estimated 10,000 ex-Gurkha heads of family live in Britain, having come here after serving in the famous brigade that since 1815 has fought in numerous conflicts, from Gallipoli to Malaya to the current war in Afghanistan. But though they have been part of the British army, many older ex-Gurkhas do not speak good English and find navigating life in the country a challenge. After a series of 24-hour fasts by demonstrators, protest organiser Gyanraj Rai on November 7, 2013 began an all-out hunger strike to push for their demands, which start with equal pension payments for Gurkha soldiers compared to their counterparts in other parts of the British army. Gurkha protesters say that current pensions do not stretch far enough in Nepal, but William Shuttlewood, director of the GurkhaWelfare Trust charity contends that they can provide a "very good standard of living" there. Gurung disagrees. He receives a pension of around £350 a month, which he says would not be enough without extra income that he makes from a rice field. To match Story BRITAIN-GURKHAS/ Picture taken October 29, 2013. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY IMMIGRATION ENVIRONMENT) 
BRITAIN-GURKHAS/
RTX155BG 
November 08, 2013 
Bhim Prashad Gurung, who served in the Gurkha regiment of the British army, points to a photograph of... 
GURUNG, Nepal 
Gurung, who served in the Gurkha regiment of the British army, points to a photograph of himself as a... 
Bhim Prashad Gurung, who served in the Gurkha regiment of the British army, points to a photograph of himself as a young soldier, as he sits at home in Gurung Village in Pokhara valley, west of Kathmandu October 29, 2013. An estimated 10,000 ex-Gurkha heads of family live in Britain, having come here after serving in the famous brigade that since 1815 has fought in numerous conflicts, from Gallipoli to Malaya to the current war in Afghanistan. But though they have been part of the British army, many older ex-Gurkhas do not speak good English and find navigating life in the country a challenge. After a series of 24-hour fasts by demonstrators, protest organiser Gyanraj Rai on November 7, 2013 began an all-out hunger strike to push for their demands, which start with equal pension payments for Gurkha soldiers compared to their counterparts in other parts of the British army. Gurkha protesters say that current pensions do not stretch far enough in Nepal, but William Shuttlewood, director of the GurkhaWelfare Trust charity contends that they can provide a "very good standard of living" there. Gurung disagrees. He receives a pension of around £350 a month, which he says would not be enough without extra income that he makes from a rice field. To match Story BRITAIN-GURKHAS/ Picture taken October 29, 2013. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY IMMIGRATION) 
Display 
Items per page 
Page 
of 1