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Environment

RTX1676E
Slippery Customers - 06 Dec 2013
Nowadays eels are becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as stocks plummet and Europe's fishing industry shrinks to make itself sustainable.
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YGA
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, checks his lines as dawn breaks on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland,...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
O'Neill checks his lines as dawn breaks on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, checks his lines as dawn breaks on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YH3
November 03, 2013
Part of an eel is seen as fisherman Shane O'Neill skins it in preparation for cooking after a morning's...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
Part of an eel is seen as fisherman O'Neill skins it in preparation for cooking after a morning's fishing...
Part of an eel is seen as fisherman Shane O'Neill skins it in preparation for cooking after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YGQ
November 03, 2013
An eel line awaits completion beside fisherman Shane O'Neills, 70, as he takes breakfast in a shipping...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
An eel line awaits completion beside O'Neills as he takes breakfast in a shipping container on Lough...
An eel line awaits completion beside fisherman Shane O'Neills, 70, as he takes breakfast in a shipping container which he uses as a workshop on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YGR
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, prepares his lines after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
O'Neill prepares his lines after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, prepares his lines after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YGT
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, steps out of a shipping container which doubles as his workshop on the...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
O'Neill steps out of a shipping container on the banks of Lough Neagh
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, steps out of a shipping container which doubles as his workshop on the banks of Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YH1
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill uses his binoculars to check the weather after a morning's fishing on Lough...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
Eel fisherman O'Neill continues his business as industry threatened at Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland...
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill uses his binoculars to check the weather after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YH4
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill checks his nets after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland,...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
O'Neill checks his nets after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill checks his nets after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YGB
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, checks his lines as dawn breaks on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland,...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
O'Neill checks his lines as dawn breaks on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, checks his lines as dawn breaks on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YGU
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill displays some of his catch after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
O'Neill displays some of his catch after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill displays some of his catch after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YGH
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, makes his way back to shore after checking his lines on Lough Neagh...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
O'Neill makes his way back to shore after checking his lines on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, makes his way back to shore after checking his lines on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. To match story IRISH-EELS/. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YGO
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, unloads his lines after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
O'Neill unloads his lines after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, unloads his lines after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YGP
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, displays some of his catch after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
O'Neill displays some of his catch after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill, 70, displays some of his catch after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YH2
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill prepares an eel for cooking after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
O'Neill prepares an eel for cooking after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill prepares an eel for cooking after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YGX
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill skins an eel in preparation for eating after a morning's fishing on Lough...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
O'Neill skins an eel in preparation for eating after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill skins an eel in preparation for eating after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YGZ
November 03, 2013
Parts of an eel skinned by fisherman Shane O'Neill in preparation for cooking, is seen after a morning's...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
Parts of an eel skinned by O'Neil in preparation for cooking after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh...
Parts of an eel skinned by fisherman Shane O'Neill in preparation for cooking, is seen after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YH6
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill fries eels after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland,...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
O'Neill fries eels after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill fries eels after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
IRISH-EELS/
RTX14YH7
November 03, 2013
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill fries eels after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland,...
Crumlin, United Kingdom
O'Neill fries eels after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh
Eel fisherman Shane O'Neill fries eels after a morning's fishing on Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, August 29, 2013. From the traditional stands of London's working class East End to haute cuisine in Japan, the eel has a long and rich history on global dinner plates. But it is becoming an increasingly rare delicacy as numbers are plummeting and fishing being cut under European regulations to help reverse declines and make numbers sustainable. Fishermen on the United Kingdom's largest lake, the shallow grey-green and nutrient rich Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, believe their traditional industry and way of life may be coming to an end. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. To match story IRISH-EELS/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
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