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CLIMATE-CHANGE/INDIA-SUNDARBANS
RTX8MBEA
January 14, 2021
On a warm November afternoon, Parul Haldar balanced precariously on the bow of a small wooden dinghy,...
SATJELIA, India
The Wider Image: Tigers pounce as storms, poverty force Indians deep into mangrove forests
On a warm November afternoon, Parul Haldar balanced precariously on the bow of a small wooden dinghy, pulling in a long net flecked with fish from the swirling brown river. Just behind her loomed the dense forest of the Sundarbans, where some 10,000 square km of tidal mangroves straddle India's northeastern coastline and western Bangladesh and open into the Bay of Bengal. Four years ago, her husband disappeared on a fishing trip deep inside the forest. Two fishermen with him saw his body being dragged into the undergrowth - one of a rising number of humans killed by tigers as they venture into the wild. That Haldar, a single mother of four, is taking such risks is testament to growing economic and ecological pressures on more than 14 million people living on the Indian and Bangladeshi sides of the low-lying Sundarbans.They have led to a reduced dependence on agriculture, a rising number of migrant workers and, for those like Haldar who can't leave the delta to work elsewhere, a reliance on the forests and rivers to survive. REUTERS/Anushree Fadnavis SEARCH "FADNAVIS SUNDARBANS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: CLIMATE-CHANGE/INDIA-SUNDARBANS
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