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CLIMATECHANGE-AUSTRALIA/WINE
RTR3YEOS
July 13, 2014
Rain droplets hang from a wire attached to a vine at the Cambridge vineyard, a part of the Frogmore Creek...
Hobart, Australia
Rain droplets hang from a wire attached to a vine at the Cambridge vineyard, a part of the Frogmore Creek...
Rain droplets hang from a wire attached to a vine at the Cambridge vineyard, a part of the Frogmore Creek winery located on the outskirts of Hobart in Tasmania June 3, 2014. Australia's wine-growing industry is responding to the rigors of climate change. A study by the U.S. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that up to 73 percent of Australian land currently used for viticulture could become unsuitable by 2050. As the country's traditional wine growing regions, including the Barossa, the Hunter Valley and Margaret River grow ever hotter and drier, winemakers are rushing to the cool climate of the tiny island state of Tasmania. While the national wine industry has shrunk 1.9 percent annually from 2009 to 2014, the Tasmanian state industry is growing at a rate of close to 10 percent per annum, according to the Tasmanian Climate Change Office. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT FOOD SOCIETY)
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