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GERMANY/
RTR2TLQW
November 04, 2011
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph in her home in Munich December 22, 2010. Two years ago,...
Munich, Germany
To match Special Report AUSTERITY-EUROPE
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph in her home in Munich December 22, 2010. Two years ago, Anna cashed in on the German government's cash-for-clunkers auto subsidy and bought her first new car in 13 years. Months later, she watched from her window as a hailstorm dented her new Fiat Panda. By that point, she wasn't even sure she could pay the instalments. In Europe, as in the United States, the global financial crisis has hit tens of millions of people over the past three years: workers have been laid off or had to accept reduced hours or lower wages, houses have been lost, students face paying more to go to university. Even as Europe has begun to grow again, parts are still struggling to deal with the impact of the crisis. Some people and families may have begun to see improvements following months of worry and belt-tightening, but that doesn't mean they will start spending freely again. The instinct to watch budgets, to save more, to avoid overextending, will linger. Picture taken December 22, 2010. To match Special Report AUSTERITY-EUROPE REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY)
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