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GERMANY-BUNKER/
RTR2YX41
March 06, 2012
Rosemarie Mielke is pictured in her apartment in a reconstructed World War Two bunker in Bremen, February...
Bremen, Germany
To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/
Rosemarie Mielke is pictured in her apartment in a reconstructed World War Two bunker in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can extend into the hundreds of thousands of euros a year. Picture taken February 22, 2012. To go with Story GERMANY-BUNKERS/ REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION SOCIETY)
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