Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for:

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/DAUGHTER-CANCER
RTX7YIAM
September 28, 2020
Using the light from an LED night lamp, nurse Will Grima takes blood samples from Rebecca Zammit Lupi,...
TAL-QROQQ, Malta
The Wider Image: The pandemic, a deadly cancer and my 14-year-old daughter
Using the light from an LED night lamp, nurse Will Grima takes blood samples from Rebecca Zammit Lupi, a 14-year-old cancer patient, in her room at Rainbow Ward in Sir Anthony Mamo Oncology Centre at Mater Dei Hospital, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tal-Qroqq, Malta, June 13, 2020. "When I first met Rebecca, she was reserved and shy, as is usually the case with most teenagers who have recently been diagnosed with cancer. After a few weeks of acting like a clown and having unloaded multiple syringes of water on her and her parents, she began to open up and the real Rebecca started to shine through. She would start to smile, laugh, and joke around. She would even show me some of her art projects and show me videos of her dance acts. When she started to enjoy playing Minecraft on the PS4 in the ward, I'd often join in when I was on break. It was always a welcome respite from the administration of treatment or ward procedures. This all helped to build rapport between us. Unfortunately, those times weren't meant to last. When COVID-19 arrived in Malta and the number of active cases were on the rise, we began to fear for the safety of our patients. This was a novel virus, with no available vaccine, and we had no idea what the effects would be on immunocompromised patients such as Rebecca. New infection prevention measures were implemented. We had to don protective gear and maintain minimal contact with patients and other staff. Patients weren't allowed out of their rooms to reduce exposure, and only one parent could stay with their child. A major part of our way of nursing was stripped from us and it was a blow to everyone's spirits; patient, parent and staff," said Grima. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi SEARCH "REBECCA LUPI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 1