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HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GEN-Z
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December 24, 2020
Jackline Bosibori, 17, a secondary school student, poses for a photograph within Lindi village of Kibera...
Nairobi, Kenya
The Wider Image: Scarred by 2020, Gen Z looks to a COVID-free future
Jackline Bosibori, 17, a secondary school student, poses for a photograph within Lindi village of Kibera slums, in Nairobi, Kenya, December 16, 2020. For Bosibori, who gave birth in November, school closures defined 2020. Many Kenyan advocacy groups fear adolescent pregnancies increased as girls were forced to stay home while parents still went to work. "If I was in school, I could have not been pregnant," she said. For Bosibori, school closures have made her dream of becoming a lawyer seem far away. "I feel I have not progressed in any way this year," laments Bosibori. "If I was in school, I could have improved in my goals." The situation makes her anxious, she said from the one-room home where she lives with six other family members. Kenyan schools have been shut since March. Bosibori wants to return when they reopen in January, but she worries about the fees. "My mom lost her job ... at this time, we don't have rent," she said. "I am stressed." "2020 was a bad year to me and it was a good year to me," Bosibori said. "It was a bad year to me because I got pregnant unexpectedly." "But it was a good year to me because I delivered my baby and she is OK." REUTERS/Monicah Mwangi SEARCH "GEN-Z COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
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