Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for:

HEALTH-EBOLA/SEX
RTR4R04V
February 24, 2015
Musa Pabai holds his son Oliver for the first time after surviving Ebola, at his home in Walakor, February...
WALAKOR, Liberia
Musa Pabai holds his son Oliver for the first time after surviving Ebola, at his home in Walakor
Musa Pabai holds his son Oliver for the first time after surviving Ebola, at his home in Walakor, February 19, 2015. Pabai left an Ebola treatment centre in Liberia in November, grateful to have survived a disease that has killed nearly 10,000 people across West Africa but fearing he still could pose grave danger to the person closest to him. Pabai had stayed in Monrovia on a self-imposed exile after November, afraid that he could still infect Hannah, his girlfriend and mother of his young son, through sexual contact despite his clean bill of health. Research has shown traces of Ebola in semen of some survivors for at least 82 days after the onset of symptoms and in vaginal secretions for a much shorter period. Although there is no conclusive scientific proof these traces are infectious, anecdotal evidence of several cases in West Africa and confirmed transmission of Marburg, another viral haemorrhagic fever, have led experts to warn of the potential risk of sexually transmitted Ebola. Picture taken February 19. REUTERS/Ricci Shryock (LIBERIA - Tags: DISASTER HEALTH)
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 1