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HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN9Z 
June 19, 2014 
Andrea Smith holds her daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three... 
WINTHROP HARBOR, UNITED STATES 
Andrea Smith holds her daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois 
Andrea Smith holds her daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three of her children have been diagnosed with atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, and one is a carrier which was diagnosed using genome sequencing. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
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