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RUSSIA-KAMCHATKA/ABORIGINES
RTR1RVL0
July 15, 2007
Folk performer Lidia Chechulina walks in the forest outside her village Pimchakh, 40 km (25 miles) from...
PIMCHATKA, Russia
To match feature RUSSIA-KAMCHATKA/ABORIGINES
Folk performer Lidia Chechulina walks in the forest outside her village Pimchakh, 40 km (25 miles) from regional capital Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky June 17, 2007. When Russians began settling in Kamchatka -- a volcanic region 12,000 km (7,500 miles) and nine time zones east of Moscow -- in the second half of the 17th century, up to 11,000 Koryaks lived here fishing, herding deer and hunting whale and walrus. Three centuries of pervasive Russian and Soviet influence and intermarriage have left an indelible mark on Kamchatka's Koryaks, who now number around 7,300 -- by far the largest indigenous group on the peninsula. To match feature RUSSIA-KAMCHATKA/ABORIGINES REUTERS/Olesya Dmitracova (RUSSIA)
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