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SCIENCE/GENOME
RTR2C8WZ
March 30, 2010
Empty sample tubes showing their unique '2DID numbers' wait to be filled at Biobank, the worlds largest...
Manchester, United Kingdom
To match Special Report SCIENCE/GENOME
Empty sample tubes showing their unique '2DID numbers' wait to be filled at Biobank, the worlds largest blood and urine sample freezer near Manchester, northern England, in this March 18, 2010 file picture. Francis Collins, who helped map the human genome, did not get around to having his own genes analyzed until last summer. And he was surprised by what he learned. Collins has a predisposition for type-2 diabetes, something he had never suspected. The lanky, former director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) discovered this through tests offered by Navigenics, 23andMe and DecodeMe -- companies that charge customers a few hundred dollars for a peek at their genetic makeup. Picture taken March 18, 2010. To match Special Report SCIENCE/GENOME REUTERS/Phil Noble (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH SCI TECH)
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