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SOUTH-SUDAN/AID
RTR34S9N
July 10, 2012
From L-R: Toma Adeng, Maria Abuk, Mary Achol, and Martha Akuch, who work as voluntary birth attendants,...
MALUALKON, South Sudan
Voluntary birth attendants pose for a photograph at the Malualkon Primary Health Care Center in Malualkon...
From L-R: Toma Adeng, Maria Abuk, Mary Achol, and Martha Akuch, who work as voluntary birth attendants, pose for a photograph at the Malualkon Primary Health Care Center in Malualkon, in the South Sudanese state of Northern Bahr el Ghazal, June 1, 2012. As in many developing nations, international aid is both an invaluable help to South Sudan and a crutch that sometimes enables it to avoid reality. Development experts have grown more sophisticated in recent decades about how they deliver aid. But in fragile states such as South Sudan, getting the balance right between helping a country and helping that country help itself remains incredibly difficult. Picture taken June 1, 2012. To match Special Report SOUTH-SUDAN/AID REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian (SOUTH SUDAN - Tags: ANNIVERSARY HEALTH SOCIETY PORTRAIT)
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