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SUDAN-POLITICS/WOMEN
RTS2LRBU
July 11, 2019
Shems Osman, 32, employee at an international company, poses for a photograph in Khartoum, Sudan, June...
Khartoum, Sudan
The Wider Image: Beaten and abused, Sudan's women bear scars of fight for freedom
Shems Osman, 32, employee at an international company, poses for a photograph in Khartoum, Sudan, June 29, 2019. Osman studied psychology in Canada. She has Canadian citizenship but she chose to return to Sudan. "In Sudan it is definitely different how women carry themselves and how they are treated, and I think this is because of our African culture more than our Arab culture. Sudanese women are just naturally strong. So, they are naturally on the frontline and they are naturally a part of revolution," she said. "I left Sudan when I was really young. When I came back, I noticed the difference between living in Sudan and living outside of Sudan. I want to change that for my country. I won't be comfortable more than I am comfortable in my own land. Anything I did outside of Sudan, wouldn't make a difference, but if I do it here, it might. I wasn't happy with the situation in Sudan and I was waiting for this revolution for a long time. I was overjoyed and overwhelmed when I heard about the first demonstrations in Khartoum late November 2018. I just couldn't wait to be a part of it. There is always fear but I think our will to change Sudan is stronger than our sense of fear. Our brothers and sisters were killed. If we go back now it is almost a shame on us. We have to continue what they started. Their death should not go in vain. We owe them that." REUTERS/Umit Bektas SEARCH "SUDAN WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
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