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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
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September 01, 2014
Edrisa Ssali (L-R) , 20, Katerega Musa, 19, and Malik Douglas Darnba, 20, from Uganda, are seen in the...
Stockholm, Sweden
Edrisa Ssali, Katerega Musa, and Malik Douglas Darnba, from Uganda, are seen in the room they share in...
Edrisa Ssali (L-R) , 20, Katerega Musa, 19, and Malik Douglas Darnba, 20, from Uganda, are seen in the room they share in Sollentuna, a suburb of Stockholm June 4, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 12 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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