Ajax loader

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for:

USA-DRUGS/SEATTLE
RTX1CY8V 
May 14, 2015 
Samples of pipes for crack cocaine and methamphetamine use sit inside the jacket pocket of Shilo Murphy,... 
Seattle, UNITED STATES 
Samples of pipes for crack cocaine and methamphetamine use sit inside the jacket pocket of Murphy, executive... 
Samples of pipes for crack cocaine and methamphetamine use sit inside the jacket pocket of Shilo Murphy, executive director of the People's Harm Reduction Alliance, the nation's largest needle-exchange program, in Seattle, Washington April 30, 2015. The People's Harm Reduction Alliance launched its free meth pipe program, which is pioneering but illegal, in March after learning from its own survey that 80 percent of area meth users would be less likely to inject drugs if given access to pipes. The theory behind the Alliance's handout program is that giving meth pipes to drug users may steer some away from needles, which are far riskier than smoking, especially if the user is sharing with another person infected with HIV or hepatitis C. There is little scientific evidence to support that claim, but the Alliance, a privately funded needle-swap group run by drug users, said it has distributed more than 1,000 pipes in Seattle in a matter of weeks and could expand to other cities in Washington state and Oregon. Opponents say giving away meth pipes discourages quitting while wasting resources on an untested scheme that will not solve a city-wide health problem. Picture taken April 30, 2015. To match Feature USA-DRUGS/SEATTLE REUTERS/David Ryder 
Sort by 
Display 
Items per page 
Page 
of 1