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USA-MEXICO/FENCE
RTX32K1K
March 24, 2017
The rust-red U.S. fence along the Mexican border has inspired various quirky architectural structures,...
Tijuana, Mexico
The Wider Image: Treehouses and mansions: in the shadow of the fence
The rust-red U.S. fence along the Mexican border has inspired various quirky architectural structures, from a frontier-themed mansion to a humble treehouse with uninterrupted views across the Californian scrubland. Carlos Torres, an architect in the northern Mexican city of Tijuana, has lived in a house in the shadow of the U.S. border for three decades, and the fence that U.S. President Donald Trump has vowed to expand begins at the end of his garden. Yet far from seeing the metal wall as an eyesore, he chose to make it a central piece of the design aesthetic of his lavish home, which he has named "The First House in Northwest Mexico." A specially erected viewpoint provides a panoramic vista into the United States, while his garden is littered with border paraphernalia, such as a signpost indicating the start of U.S. territory. Although Torres has embraced his little section of wall, he doubted the larger fence that Trump envisages will work. "Walls won't halt immigration," he said from his viewing balcony, which also looks out onto the Pacific ocean. Trump, he said, "doesn't know what he's talking about. Here at this fence, people keep crossing every week." REUTERS/Edgard Garrido SEARCH "FENCE GARRIDO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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