Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for:

USA-MISSOURI/SHOOTING-WIDERIMAGE
RTR4FH4O
November 25, 2014
Afghan anti-riot policemen (R-L) Habib, 21, Sayed Rahman, 22, Mohammad Nabi, 22, Momin Khan, 22, and...
Kabul, Afghanistan
Afghan anti-riot policemen pose for photo at their base in Kabul
Afghan anti-riot policemen (R-L) Habib, 21, Sayed Rahman, 22, Mohammad Nabi, 22, Momin Khan, 22, and Abdul Ali, 25, pose for photo at their base in Kabul October 12, 2014. When the killing of an unarmed black teenager by a white policeman in Ferguson, Missouri, in August sparked sometimes violent protests, the response of police in camouflage gear and armoured vehicles wielding stun grenades and assault rifles seemed more like a combat operation than a public order measure. Some U.S. police departments have recently acquired U.S. military-surplus hardware from wars abroad, but there are many law enforcers around the world whose rules of engagement also allow the use of lethal force with relatively few restrictions. But for every regulation that gives police wide scope to use firearms, there is another code that sharply limits their use. In Afghanistan, "the police can use weapons or explosives against a group of people only if they it has ... disturbed security by means of arms, and if the use of other means of force ... has proved ineffective". Afghan police are required to give no fewer than six warnings - three verbal and three warning shots - before using force in this situation. Picture taken October 12. REUTERS/Omar Sobhani (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW SOCIETY PORTRAIT)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 04 OF 28 FOR WIDER IMAGE PACKAGE 'THE FORCE OF THE LAW'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'ENFORCERS'
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 1