Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for:

YUGOSLAVIA-ARCHITECTURE/
RTS2TGQB
October 30, 2019
Brutalism was popular throughout the eastern bloc but the former Yugoslavia made it its own - seizing...
PETROVA GORA, Croatia
The Wider Image: Yugoslavia's brutalist relics fascinate the Instagram generation
Brutalism was popular throughout the eastern bloc but the former Yugoslavia made it its own - seizing on it as a way to forge a visual identity poised between East and West. Interest in the style is soaring - particularly since a 2018 exhibition in New York's Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) called Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948-1980. After World War Two socialist Yugoslavia led by Josip Broz Tito set out to reconstruct a land destroyed by fighting. Initially allied to the Soviet Union, Tito broke with Soviet leader Joseph Stalin in 1948. Residential blocks, hotels, civic centres and monuments all made of concrete shot up across the country. The architecture was supposed to show the power of a state between two worlds - Western democracy and the communist East, looking to forge its own path and create a socialist utopia. But after Tito died in 1980, and economic crisis took hold, the new elites sought to distance themselves from the socialist regime, including its architecture. In 1991 the series of wars began that led to the collapse of Yugoslavia. REUTERS/Marko Djurica SEARCH "ARCHITECTURE DJURICA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: YUGOSLAVIA-ARCHITECTURE/
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 1